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All Courses

(See selected courses in Anthropology, page 311, Art, page 319, and History, page 466)

4 hours lecture, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 46 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M40.

Description: This introductory course is an overview of financial accounting, why it is important, and how it is used by investors and creditors to make decisions. It covers the accounting information system, and the recording and reporting of business transactions with a focus on the accounting cycle, the applications of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), the classified financial statements, and statement analysis. Other topics include issues related to asset, liability, and equity valuation; revenue and expense recognition; cash flows; internal controls; and ethics. This course is intended for students majoring in accounting or other fields related to business administration. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ACCT 110.
4 hours lecture, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Accounting 116A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 46 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M40.

Description: This course is a study of how managers use accounting information in decision-making, planning, directing operations, and controlling. The course focuses on cost terms and concepts, cost behavior, cost structure, and cost-volume-profit analysis. Other topics include profit planning, standard costs, operations and capital budgeting, cost control, and accounting for costs in manufacturing organizations. This course is intended for students majoring in accounting or other fields related to business administration. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ACCT 120.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in: Accounting 116A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course introduces the student to tax concepts and tax laws that govern individuals who pay federal income taxes. Emphasis is placed on recognizing the social, economic, and political factors that Congress considers when they create tax laws. This course relates tax codes to the individual and identifies how tax planning skills can determine economic outcomes. Furthermore, it demonstrates and differentiates between tax avoidance and tax evasion. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1 hour lecture, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in: Accounting 120.

Description: This course is a study of California personal income taxation and tax planning. Emphasis is placed on tax concepts and related social economic issues rather than tax return preparation. The course distinguishes between California and Federal Income Tax requirements. This course is intended for all students interested in California income tax. AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Accounting 116A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: The course provides instruction in the principles of fund accounting and budgeting including revenues, appropriations, encumbrances, internal controls for both governmental and not-for-profit entities. AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Accounting 116A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is a basic course concerned with financial statement auditing as well as other assurance services provided by professional auditors. All phases of auditing including ethics, standards, planning, fieldwork and reporting are covered. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in: Accounting 116A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: accuracy and completeness. The main objective is to provide the student with a complete guide to creating and maintaining a proper accounting This course illustrates how to use accounting computer programs in a commercial business enterprise. The main objective is to provide the student with a complete guide to creating and maintaining a proper accounting system while using a popular accounting software program (QuickBooks Pro) on a personal computer. The full accounting cycle and payroll is evaluated within a typical business environment. Business transactions are identified, labeled, recorded, and processed for both service and merchandise businesses. In addition, financial statements are constructed, evaluated, and to creating and completeness. This course is intended for students majoring in Accounting orthose interested in computer" accounting programs. (FT) AA/AS; CSU. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Accounting 116A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course introduces students to advanced theory and concepts with an emphasis on financial accounting standards and principles. Emphasis is placed on corporate financial statements. Topics include the acquisition, valuation, and disposition of assets as well as the identification and reporting of current liabilities. This course is intended for students majoring in Accounting and those interested in upgrading their accounting job/career skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Accounting 201A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course continues the study of advanced theory and concepts that was started in Accounting 201A. Emphasis is placed on the valuation and presentation of liabilities and stockholders’ equity, revenue recognition, leases and tax accounting. This course is intended for students who are majoring in Accounting. (FT) AA/AS; CSU. This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.

(See selected courses in Anthropology, page 311, Art, page 319, and History, page 466)

2 hours lecture, 2 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 42 and, English 43, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R4, and M30.

Description: This course is designed to prepare students interested in entering the health care industry for the college level interdisciplinary skills required in math, oral and written communication. In-class essay development, mathematical word problems, logical reasoning and professionalism are emphasized. (FT) Not applicable to the Associate Degree.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or, English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5, and W5; Mathematics 43 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent..

Description: This introductory course is designed for students interested in entering the human or veterinary health care industry. This course explores the history and key aspects of the practice of health care in the United States The content provides ways to identify general aptitudes and skills required in health careers and provide students with an opportunity to match individual aptitudes, interests and abilities to specific health careers. (FT) Not applicable to the Associate Degree.
4 hours lecture, 4 units Grade Only

Corequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 115L.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language/Interpreting 100.

Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in American Sign Language/Interpreting 215 and 215L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: Description: This is an entry-level course designed to introduce students to American Sign Language (ASL) and Fingerspelled Signs as it is used within Deaf Culture. Students are taught to use American Sign Language by signing, fingerspelled signing, using facial grammar at the novice level. Emphasis is placed on the development of ASL and receptive skills. The course is designed for students who want to explore the basic language structure of ASL and Deaf Culture. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Corresponds to two years of high school study.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Corequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 115.

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign "Language/Interpreting 100.

Description: This laboratory course provides students with the opportunity to apply their American Sign Language (ASL) skills through an individualized program, small groups and large group environment. Students utilize interactive media to express their comprehension of basic ASL sentences and stories as well as their signing skills. Lab activities are designed to provide students the opportunity to practice vocabulary and syntax. This course is designed for students who want to explore the basic language structure of ASL and Deaf Culture. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
4 hours lecture, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 115 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Should be: American Sign Language/Interpreting 115L

Advisory: Should be: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language/Interpreting 100.

Description: This course is a continuation of the study of American Sign Language (ASL) at the beginning intermediate level. Emphasis is placed on increasing development of students’ receptive and expressive skills through ASL vocabulary, fingerspelled signs and knowledge of Deaf Culture. Instruction includes a natural approach to teaching a second language by exposing students to authentic conversations in the classroom. This course is designed for students and/or professionals interested in working and interacting with Deaf people. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Corequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 116.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language/Interpreting 101.

Description: This laboratory course provides students with the opportunity to apply their American Sign Language (ASL) skills through an individualized program, small groups and large group environment. Students utilize interactive media to express their comprehension of basic to intermediate ASL sentences and stories as well as to hone their signing skills. Lab activities are designed to provide students the opportunity to practice vocabulary and syntax at the intermediate level. This course is designed for students and/or professionals interested in working and interacting with Deaf people. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language 104.

Description: This course is an introduction to the unique aspects of Deaf Culture and Deaf community. Emphasis is place on in-depth discussion of the beliefs and customs of this sociolinguistic/cultural minority in relation to language use and history of Deaf people in the United States of America. This course is intended for students who are interested in learning about Deaf Culture and the Deaf community. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language 105.

Description: This course is a study of the audiological, educational, social, and communicative aspects of people who are deaf and hearing impaired. Emphasis is placed on historical perspectives and current trends, philosophies, and ideologies related to deafness. This course is intended for students who are interested in learning about the pathological aspects of deaf and hearing impaired people. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in American Sign Language/Interpreting 116 and 116L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an intermediate-advanced study of American Sign Language Fingerspelled Signs and Numbering systems. Emphasis is placed on Native Fingerspelled Signs. Students participate in extensive drills expressively and receptively. This course is intended for American Sign Language (ASL) Studies and ASL-English Interpretation majors pursuing employment or a career in ASL and/or Deaf related fields. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
4 hours lecture, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 116 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 215L.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in: American Sign Language/Interpreting 214 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language 200.

Description: This third course in American Sign Language (ASL) is designed to enhance students’ receptive and expressive skills at an advanced intermediate level. Emphasis is placed on the ASL syntax, facial grammar, vocabulary, and fingerspelling skills that enable students to participate in increasingly more complex conversations with Deaf community members. Instruction utilizes a natural approach to teaching a second language by engaging students in authentic conversations within the classroom environment. Conversational content seeks to develop student knowledge and understanding of the Deaf community and its art and history. This course is intended for students or professionals interested in working and/or interacting with Deaf people. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Corequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 215.

Description: This laboratory course provides students with the opportunity to apply their American Sign Language (ASL) skills through an individualized program. Students utilize interactive media to express their comprehension of intermediate to advanced ASL sentences and narratives as well as to hone their signing skills. Lab activities are designed to provide students the opportunity to practice vocabulary and syntax at the intermediate to advanced level. This course is designed for students and/or professionals interested in working and interacting with Deaf people. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
4 hours lecture, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 215 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 216L.

Description: This fourth course in the study of American Sign Language (ASL) continues to build upon students’ receptive and expressive skills at the advanced level while expanding their knowledge of Deaf culture and the influences of other sign language systems. Emphasis is placed on advanced fingerspelling, ASL structure and vocabulary. Instruction utilizes a natural approach to teaching a second language by engaging students in authentic conversations within the classroom environment. This course is intended for students or professionals interested in working and/or interacting with Deaf people. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Corequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 216.

Description: This laboratory course provides students with the opportunity to apply their American Sign Language (ASL) skills through an individualized program. Students utilize interactive media to express their comprehension of advanced ASL sentences and narratives as well as to hone their signing skills. Lab activities are designed to provide students the opportunity to practice vocabulary and syntax at the advanced level. This course is designed for students and/or professionals interested in working and interacting with Deaf people. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in American Sign Language/Interpreting 216 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is designed to provide students with an analysis of the symbolic and linguistic structure of American Sign Language (ASL) and English including other spoken languages, other sign languages, and other related sign systems. Topics include phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, grammar and discourse. This course examines the bilingual and bicultural practices, language acquisition, sociolinguistics and related research. This course is intended for students who plan to transfer and/or are interested in learning about the linguistic aspects of American Sign Language. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 216 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in American Sign Language/Interpreting 235 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language/Interpreting 205.

Description: This course introduces students to cognitive and critical thinking skills necessary for interpretation between English and American Sign Language, including discourse analysis of source language messages, paraphrasing and summarizing techniques, and identification of main points. Emphasis is placed on the steps necessary to produce an equivalent target language message through transliteration, consecutive interpretation, simultaneous interpretation, and peer collaboration. Students are introduced to the skills and knowledge necessary to become culturally sensitive, ethical, professional ASL–English interpreters. Instruction for class lectures and discussion may be through two modalities, ASL to English and/or English to ASL. Students are expected to have beginning level of interpreting competency in both ASL and English in order to succeed in this course as instruction occurs in both languages. This course is designed for ASL-English interpretation majors and accommodates those seeking the Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) certificate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in: American Sign Language/Interpreting 230 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: TThis course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language/Interpreting 209.

Description: This course is a practical study of interpreting as a profession. Emphasis is placed on the application of the code of professional conduct in the field. Topics include the national standards for evaluation and certification, public employment versus private employment, and resume development. This course may be taught using ASL to English and/or English to ASL. This course is designed for Interpreting majors and accommodates those seeking the Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) certificate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 230 and 235, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in American Sign Language/Interpreting 245 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language/Interpreting 207.

Description: This course is designed to provide development of skills in receiving signed messages and presenting an equivalent message using spoken English. Emphasis is placed on Sign Language receptivity, appropriate English word choices, vocal inflection, and English structure at the beginner voice interpreter level. Instructor may use ASL to English and/or English to ASL techniques when teaching this course. This course is designed for Interpreting majors and accommodates those seeking the Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) certificate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 230 and 235, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in American Sign Language/Interpreting 240 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language/Interpreting 210.

Description: This course is designed to provide students of American Sign Language (ASL) – English Interpretation with an introduction to the application of interpreting skills to a variety of professional settings and situations. Settings covered include, but are not limited to Community, Conference, Deaf/Blind, Educational (K-12 and Post-secondary), Legal, Medical, Mental Health, Performing Arts, Religious Interpreting, and Video Relay Interpreting, and Private Practice and Freelance. The instructor for this course may use ASL to English and/or English to ASL techniques. This course is intended for students who plan to transfer and/or are interested in becoming an ASL Interpreter by majoring in American Sign Language/Interpreting and accommodates those seeking the Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) certificate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 240 and 245, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in American Sign Language/Interpreting 255 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language/Interpreting 206.

Description: This course is an advanced study of the interpretation process. Emphasis is placed on the application of previously-learned American Sign Language (ASL) skills to develop the cognitive and critical thinking abilities required for interpreting and transliterating at the advanced level. Consecutive interpreting and simultaneous interpreting skills of source language text are utilized throughout the course. Instructor may use ASL to English and/or English to ASL techniques when teaching this course. This course is designed for Interpreting majors and accommodates those seeking the Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) certificate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 240 and 245, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in American Sign Language/Interpreting 250 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for American Sign Language/Interpreting 208.

Description: This course is designed to provide advanced development of skills in receiving signed and/or voiced messages and presenting an equivalent message using spoken English, signed English or American Sign Language (ASL) as requested by instructor. Emphasis is placed on advanced sign language receptivity, appropriate word choices, vocal or signed inflection, and English and ASL structure at the advanced voice interpreter level. Instructor may use ASL to English and/or English to ASL techniques when teaching this course. This course is designed for Interpreting majors and accommodates those seeking the Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) certificate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: American Sign Language/Interpreting 150, 155, 214, 225, 250 and 255, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a supervised field experience designed to provide students with the opportunity to expand their skills and knowledge in the interpreting/ transliterating profession through practice in various interpreting settings/situations. This course utilizes ASL and/or English in its instruction at an advanced level. In addition to the field experience, students are required to attend on-campus seminars. This course is designed for Interpreting majors and accommodates those seeking the Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) certificate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
4.5 hours lab, 1.5 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Biology 107, Chemistry 100 and Chemistry 100L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This introductory course provides Animal Health Technology students with practical experience in the basic husbandry of many animal species. Students learn and practice “essential” and “recommended” tasks as required by the American Veterinary Medical Association and the California Veterinary Medical Board Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Tasks List. These tasks include methods of housing or caging, nutrition and feeding, sanitation and hygiene in an animal setting, and handling and restraint of the various species. Students are actively involved in the daily care of the program’s resident animals. Student teams are assigned to a rotation schedule so that every student works with every animal during the semester. Applicable veterinary medical and animal husbandry terminology is included. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
4.5 hours lab, 1.5 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 100A, 105, 105L, 115, 145 and 145L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This course provides Animal Health Technology students with significant responsibility in the resident animal care and advanced techniques in the general husbandry of many animal species. Students learn and practice “essential” and “recommended” tasks as required by the American Veterinary Medical Association and the California Veterinary Medical Board Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Tasks List. These tasks include advanced methods of housing or caging, nutrition and feeding, sanitation and hygiene in an animal setting, and handling and restraint of the various species. Students are actively involved in the daily care of the program’s resident animals. Students supervise student teams assigned in a rotation schedule. Applicable veterinary medical and animal husbandry terminology is included. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 105L.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This is introductory lecture course is for the Animal Health Technology student. It defines the role of the Animal Health Technician in private veterinary practice, research institutions, regulatory agencies and zoos. Topics covered include basic animal care and management, feeding, species identifications, behavior, handling skills, animal restraint, sanitation, personal hygiene, medicating, zoonotic disease risk factors, animal nursing skills, instruments and equipment, terminology, veterinary practice ethics and legal responsibilities. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
6 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 105.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This introductory course is for students in the Animal Health Technology Program. It utilizes demonstrations, laboratory exercises, group activities, and lectures to illustrate the principles presented in Animal Health Technology 105. Course work fulfills the student’s need to learn and practice “recommended” and “essential” tasks from the American Veterinary Medical Association’s and the Registered Veterinary Technician Exam Committee’s Skills, Knowledge and Abilities Tasks List. These tasks include animal restraint and handling skills, medicating techniques, breed and species identification, basic animal nursing skills, poisonous plant identification, surgical equipment and veterinary medical equipment identification, basic nutrition, terminology, sanitation/sterilization, and personal hygiene. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 2 units Grade Only

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This course is for students enrolled in the Animal Health Technology Program. This veterinary office procedures course is designed to introduce the Animal Health Technology student to the development and facilitation of client care, staff management, financial guidelines, patient management and record keeping in a veterinary setting. Topics include: client and staff communication, veterinary medical ethics, veterinary logs and legalities, computer usage, financial management, and purchasing and inventory management in relationship to a veterinary establishment. Resume writing and job interviewing skills are also covered. Appropriate veterinary terminology is included. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 105, 105L, 145 and 145L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 125L.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This course provides Animal Health Technology students with an introduction to the clinical examination of blood, urine, feces, dermal, and other commonly analyzed samples found in the veterinary field. Topics include: the safe and proper collection of diverse samples, the safe and proper handling of samples, the various methods of sample analysis, and the significance of normal and abnormal results. The identification, life cycle, and clinical importance of ectoparasites, endoparasites, and fungal parasites are discussed. Appropriate stains, reagents, and terminology are included. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
6 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 105, 105L, 145 and 145L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Animal Health Technology 125.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This clinical pathology laboratory course is designed to provide Animal Health Technology students with the opportunity to practice the principles and procedures of clinical pathology. Techniques for the safe and proper collection, handling, and storage of blood, urine, fecal, ear, vaginal, milk, and skin samples in various species are introduced and practiced by the student. Students perform analytical tests appropriate for each sample type and evaluate the results. Safe operation and proper maintenance of laboratory equipment commonly used in the veterinary field is stressed. Appropriate veterinary medical terminology is presented. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 2 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 145, 145L and 205, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Mathematics 34A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M20.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This course is for Animal Health Technology students. The course provides the student with an introduction to the actions and uses of pharmacological agents: drug classifications, modes of action, indications and contradictions, routes of administration, and mechanisms of elimination. Dispensing and pharmacy management as well as the laws regulating controlled substances are covered. Students are expected to correctly solve medical math problems and calculate drug doses. Appropriate medical terminology is included. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Biology 107, Chemistry 100 and Chemistry 100L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 145L.

Advisory: English 48, English 49 and Mathematics 46, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5, W5 and M40.

Description: Mathematics 46 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M40.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Animal Health Technology 120. This lecture course is designed to introduce the Animal Health Technology student to the comparative normal anatomy and physiology of selected domestic animal species. The eleven anatomical systems are covered and material presented ranges from the microscopic cellular level to the level of the full organism. Relevant application of structure and function to the clinical medical situations is addressed. Appropriate veterinary medical terminology is included with each system. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Prerequisite: Biology 107, Chemistry 100 and Chemistry 100L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 145. Advisory: English 48, English 49 and Mathematics 46, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5, W5 and M40. Mathematics 46 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M40.

Advisory: English 48, English 49 and Mathematics 46, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5, W5 and M40.

Description: Mathematics 46 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M40.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Animal Health Technology 120. This veterinary anatomy and physiology laboratory course is designed to provide the Animal Health Technology student with the opportunity to investigate and study the principles of normal anatomy and physiology presented in the corresponding lecture course. Techniques for the safe and proper dissection are introduced and practiced by the student during the extensive animal dissection. All eleven anatomical systems are studied through actual dissection or models. Relevant application of structure and function to the clinical medical situations is addressed. Appropriate medical terminology is included with each system. Animal dissection is carried out by each student. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 145 and 145L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Animal Health Technology 125 and 125L.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission – must be admitted to program.

Description: This course provides Animal Health Technology students with an introduction to infectious, noninfectious, and zoonotic diseases and conditions of domestic animals. Material covered includes the etiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and clinical signs of each disease. This course also details disease or condition-specific nursing care, treatments or diagnostic test methods. Appropriate veterinary medical terminology is included. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 145 and 145L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 215L.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission – must be admitted to program.

Description: This course introduces the Animal Health Technician student to the use of radiography and role of radiography and imaging in the veterinary medical fields. Topics include radiation, x-ray beam production, intensifying screens, cassettes, grid usage, latent and visible image formation, film processing, alternative imaging methods, and legal requirements. Protocols for commonly used radiographic studies and introductory radiographic film interpretation are included. Special emphasis is placed on radiation safety for the patient and all personnel. Also included is the proper use and maintenance of all veterinary radiographic and processing equipment. Appropriate imaging terminology is included. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 105L, 145 and 145L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 215.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission – must be admitted to program.

Description: This course is designed to provide the Animal Health Technology students with the opportunity to practice the concepts of radiology. The students utilize established veterinary positioning and technical protocols. They expose and process radiographs to develop a technique chart for commonly used veterinary radiographic studies, including contrast studies. The students also practice radiographic film evaluation techniques, radiation log production, and radiographic equipment maintenance. Darkroom procedures and practices that prevent artifacts are employed including equipment maintenance. An introduction to performing an ultrasound abdominal exam is provided including handling and maintenance of the equipment. Also included is an introduction to digital dental exam, including handling and maintenance of the equipment. Procedures and protocols for radiation safety of patient, handler, and equipment are stressed. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 125 and 125L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 227.

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Animal Health Technology 135 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission – must be admitted to program.

Description: This lecture course is designed to introduce the Animal Health Technology student to veterinary anesthesia, surgical and medical nursing techniques, dental hygiene, emergency first aid, and correct legal documentation. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of veterinary medical terminology to explain techniques of intravenous and inhalation anesthesia, surgical asepsis, instrument sterilization, patient monitoring, and pre operative, operative, post operative and after care nursing. Additional topics include fluid therapy, bandaging/ splints/casts, and commonly performed medical procedures. Appropriate pharmacological agents are discussed throughout the course with emphasis on classification, dosage, method of action, method of administration, dispensing procedures and pharmacy management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 125 and 125L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Animal Health Technology 135 and 225, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission - must be admitted to program.

Description: This surgical nursing and anesthesia laboratory course provides Animal Health Technology students with the opportunity to practice the principles and procedures of surgical nursing and anesthesia. Topics include surgical asepsis, instrument sterilization, patient monitoring, surgical and medical nursing, dental prophylaxis, emergency first aid, bandages, splints, casts, catheters, suturing patterns, collection and analysis of clinical pathology samples, blood transfusion therapy and cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. Students calculate anesthetic doses, fluid drip rates, and post-operative medication doses and practice safe operation and proper maintenance of anesthetic machines, anesthetic-surgical monitoring equipment, crash carts, and laboratory equipment commonly used in the veterinary field. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 125, 125L, 135, 225 and 227, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission – must be admitted to program.

Description: This lab course is designed to introduce the Animal Health Technology student to practical application of veterinary anesthesia, surgical and medical nursing techniques, dental hygiene, emergency first aid, and correct legal documentation. Techniques of intravenous and inhalation anesthesia, surgical asepsis, pre-operative, operative, post-operative, after care nursing and patient monitoring are performed by assisting the veterinarian. Instrument sterilization, fluid therapy, bandaging/splints/casts, and commonly performed medical treatments and procedures are practiced by each student. Appropriate pharmacological agents are discussed, and utilized including classification, dosage, method of action, method of administration, calculation, dispensing procedures and pharmacy management. Appropriate veterinary medical terminology is applied. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
150 hours other, 2 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 105, 105L, 115, 125, 125L, 145, 145L and 205, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission – must be admitted to program. This course is not open to students with previous credit for Animal Health Technology 235.

Description: This course provides Animal Health Technology students with workplace experience in an affiliated veterinary or research institution. Students are assigned entry level and general duties, such as caring for hospitalized patients, handling and restraint, assisting in the reception and exam rooms, conducting basic laboratory procedures, and administering medications. Students work with a supervisor toward mastering the “essential” and “recommended” skills as delineated by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s and the Registered Veterinary Technician Exam Committee’s Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Tasks List. These skills are listed on a separate Directed Clinical Practice Task List. Clinical work is coordinated by a member of the college staff. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
150 hours other, 2 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 225 and 235A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Animal Health Technology 215 and 215L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission – must be admitted to program.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Animal Health Technology 235.

Description: This course provides Animal Health Technology students with advanced workplace experience in an affiliated veterinary or research institution. Students are assigned general and advanced tasks, such as assisting in surgery, monitoring anesthesia and recovery, cleaning wounds and ears, applying splints or bandages, dispensing prescriptions, performing dental prophylaxis, and conducting client education. Students work independently under the direction of a supervisor toward mastering the “essential” and “recommended” skills as delineated by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s and the Registered Veterinary Technician Exam Committee’s Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Tasks List. These skills are listed on a separate Directed Clinical Practice Task List. Clinical work is coordinated by a member of the college staff. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 2 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 100B, Animal Health Technology 125L and Animal Health Technology 225, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 255L.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission – must be admitted to program. This course is not open to students with previous credit for Animal Health Technology 250.

Description: This lecture course is designed for the Animal Health Technology student. The course covers the use of animals in biomedical research with an emphasis on common laboratory species, animal welfare legislation and the philosophy of laboratory animal management. The course includes handling, restraint, husbandry, care and observation of laboratory species. Methods and procedures involved in laboratory animal breeding, injections, anesthesia, sample collection, medicating, nutrition, euthanasia and necropsy are also covered. Appropriate terminology is included. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Prerequisite: Animal Health Technology 100B, Animal Health Technology 125L and Animal Health Technology 225, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Animal Health Technology 255.

Limitation on Enrollment: Special Admission – must be admitted to program. This course is not open to students with previous credit for Animal Heath Technology 250.

Description: This laboratory animal medicine laboratory course is designed to provide the Animal Health Technology student with the opportunity to practice the principles and procedures presented in the Laboratory Animal Medicine lecture. Students apply regulations and ethical principles to various situations. Techniques for the safe and proper animal restraint, anesthesia, injection techniques, and sample collection are introduced and practiced by the student. Students also perform tattooing, ear notching and other procedures commonly utilized in the research setting. Students are required to perform a necropsy following established guidelines. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a survey of human evolution, variation and adaptation. Emphasis is placed on the study of primates, human heredity, variability of modern populations and fossil records of early hominids/hominins and hominoids. This course is intended for anthropology majors and all students interested in life and/or behavioral sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a survey of cultural anthropology using a comparative, cross-cultural approach. Emphasis is placed on the study of how various peoples around the world have adapted to their environments and developed behaviors to meet their biological, economic, psychological, social and political needs.This course is intended for anthropology majors and all students interested in life and/or behavioral sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a practical study of biological anthropology. Students perform field and laboratory studies in genetics, human variation, human osteology, anthropometry, hominid/hominin evolution, comparative primate anatomy, primate behavior, and forensic anthropology. This course is intended for anthropology majors and all students interested in life and/or behavioral sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an introductory study of the history, methods and theory of archaeology. Emphasis is placed on the techniques of archaeological data collection and analysis, cultural innovations, reconstruction and interpretation of the past and Cultural Resource Management (CRM) work. This course is designed for students planning to major in Anthropology and/or to conduct upper division work in archaeology at a four-year institution. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ANTH 150.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a survey of magic and religion as expressed through rituals, myths, and symbols in cross-cultural perspective. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of magic, witchcraft, and religion. This course is intended for students majoring in anthropology and all other interested students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 4 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: , or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Anthropology 265: Introduction to Archaeological Field Work.

Description: This course is an introduction to the basic techniques of archaeological field work. Emphasis is placed on site survey, site layout, excavation, artifact identification, laboratory analysis and report writing. Topics also include use of compass and transit, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). This course is designed for Anthropology and Archaeology majors as well as students interested in prehistoric and/or historic research. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for ANTH 265: Archaeological Artifacts Analysis or Laboratory Analysis of Archaeological Materials.

Description: This course is a practical study of archaeological artifact analysis. Emphasis is placed on artifact typology and seriation methods used in the preparation of archaeological reports. Students learn the most current techniques for describing, classifying, cataloging and documenting archaeological materials. This course is designed for students majoring in anthropology with an emphasis in archaeology and for anyone interested in a career in the field of archaeology or employment in Cultural Resource Management (CRM). (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a practical study of archaeological animal bone analysis. Emphasis is placed on animal bone identification and human use of animals for food and other purposes. Students learn the most current techniques for describing, classifying, cataloging, and documenting archaeological animal bone. This course is designed for students majoring in anthropology with an emphasis in archaeology and for anyone interested in a career in archaeology or employment in Cultural Resource Management (CRM). (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a survey of the history and experiences of North American Indian cultures north of Mexico. Emphasis is placed on the development of American Indian comparative ethnology within the larger discipline of cultural anthropology. All North American Indian culture areas are introduced and a number of exemplar cultures are selected for in-depth review. This course is for all students interested in cultural anthropology and/or Native American ethnography. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Anthropology 265B.

Description: This course presents the cultural forces, among other social motivations, that are powerful influences on health and wellness-related behavior. Medical anthropology is a combined sub-branch of biological and cultural anthropology and is concerned with the application of anthropological and behavioral science theories and methods to address questions about health, illness and healing. This course is designed for students interested in culture, biology, and health. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a comparative study of Native Peoples who lived within the culture area known as California. Emphasis is placed on precontact cultures and the influence of European contact. This course is intended for anthropology students and all students interested in the Native Peoples of California. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a study of the cultural history of Latin America from precolumbian to colonial and contemporary civilizations. Emphasis is placed on the Mesoamerican and Andean civilizations. Students use contemporary anthropological research, ethnohistoric and archaeological data to assess and compare the rich cultural experiences of past and present peoples. This course is intended for anthropology majors and all students interested in Latin American civilization and culture. AA/AS; CSU; UC. This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 288. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
6 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Description: This course is designed for all students who wish to develop basic hand drafting skills for use in Architectural, Civil Engineering, Construction, Interior Design, and Landscape programs. Topics include lettering, line control, sketching, and use of drafting instruments. This course is designed for students interested in developing hand drawing skills for use in architecture, landscape architecture, interior design, and construction. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5, Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Description: This course is a practical study ArchiCAD software and its application to architectural design. Emphasis is placed on the use of ArchiCAD software to develop and document architectural models. This course is designed for architecture majors and anyone interested in 3-D architectural modeling. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an advanced practical study of ArchiCAD and building information modeling (BIM). Emphasis is placed on complex aspects of the ArchiCAD program used in developing architectural construction documents and photo-realistic design presentations. This course is intended for advanced Architectural students and professionals. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5. Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Architecture 100A.

Description: This course introduces students to the professions of Architecture and Environmental Design. Students are exposed to the education requirements, professional practice, and applications in three major design fields that encompass Architecture and Environmental Design: Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Interior Design. Presentations include education, history, theory, professional practice, applications, guest lecturers and field trips. This course is recommended for students interested in exploring the field of Environmental Design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU
6 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5, Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Architecture 100 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a practical study of computer aided drafting and design for architectural, construction, and interior design purposes using AutoCAD. Emphasis is placed on two-dimensional (2D) drawing commands. This course is intended for students majoring in architecture and interior design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is designed for students who wish to develop computer aided drafting and design skills, using the AutoCAD program, for use in Architectural, Construction, and Interior Design programs. This course is a continuation of Architecture 105 designed for students who wish to develop advanced 3D computer aided drafting (CAD) skills. This course expands the foundation developed in Architecture 105 and deals with more complex aspects of the CAD program and its use in the development of architectural construction documents. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5, Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Description: This course is a hands-on study of computer-aided drafting and design (CADD) using three dimensional (3-D) parametric solid modeling programs, such as Revit and AutoCAD. Emphasis is placed on the use of CADD to electronically assemble projects from instructor-defined programs and to coordinate those drawings into architectural construction documents. This course is designed for architecture, interior design, and building construction technology majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 107 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an advanced, practical study of Revit and Building Information Modeling (BIM). Emphasis is placed on the complex aspects of the Revit program used in the development of two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and presentation documents. This course is intended for advanced Architecture students and practicing professionals. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 7.5 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 100 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Architecture 130 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for both Architecture 110 and Architecture 150.

Description: This course presents methods of construction and drafting practices as applied to architectural construction documents. Students use and apply reference materials and building codes to develop architectural contract documents that include foundation plans and details for light wood frame and masonry structures. This course is designed for architecture and building construction technology students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an introductory survey of global history of architecture. It covers early stone and wood architecture in relation to cultural and aesthetic elements of world civilization. Emphasis is placed on comparing and contrasting architectural structures including those from the Ancient World, Europe, Middle East, Asia, and the Americas. Historically significant structures are analyzed and technical, regional, and natural influences on architecture are explored. This course is intended for architecture students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5. This course is an introductory survey

Description: This course is an introductory survey of Renaissance through Contemporary architecture. Emphasis is placed on comparing and contrasting architectural structures including those from Asia, the Americas, Europe, and Middle East. Cultural and aesthetic elements of world civilization are emphasized. This course is intended for architecture students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a study of the construction constraints and program criteria for the selection and installation of building materials for residential and commercial construction projects. This course is intended for architectural design students, design professionals, construction trades people transitioning to supervisory positions, persons preparing for the trades portion of the general contractor’s license exam, appraisers and others requiring knowledge of building materials and installation for residential and commercial buildings. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This field observation course provides students with the opportunity to observe, identify, and discuss a variety of trees used for landscape architectural design in southern California. Emphasis is placed on developing the student’s working knowledge of regional tree nomenclature, identification and ecological requirements as they relate to landscape design and landscape management. This course is designed for students interested in identifying trees for use in landscape design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This field observation course provides students with the opportunity to observe, identify, and discuss shrubs, vines, and groundcovers for landscape architectural design in southern California. Emphasis is placed on developing the student’s working knowledge of regional plant nomenclature, identification and ecological requirements as they relate to landscape design and landscape management. This course is designed for students interested in identifying plants for use in landscape design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Grade Only

Advisory: Architecture 100 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to environmental design based on aesthetics and functions in the landscape. Emphasis is placed on the basic principles of design, including color theory and site planning. Students create concept drawings, models and color plans. This course is designed for students and professionals interested in garden design, landscape architecture, architecture and related fields. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 84 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to architecture and environmental design. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of form and space as applied to twodimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) design projects. This course is intended for all students interested in architectural design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 100 and 170, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30 and Architecture 220 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a practical study of architectural design and project development. Emphasis is placed the creation and presentation of building designs. Topics include an introduction to contemporary design theory. This course is intended for architecture majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 172 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 42 and Architecture 220, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course an advanced practical study of architectural design based on advanced contemporary architectural theory. Students analyze and design architectural projects with emphasis on the plan, section, building form and environmental issues. Students are required to present their design projects to the class. This course is designed for architecture students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 175 and 220, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 and Mathematics 46, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6, W6 and M40; Architecture 101 or 105 and 221, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Architecture 180.

Description: This course is the second semester of advanced architectural design. Emphasis is placed on building plan, section, and form, as well as on environmental concerns, urban design and sustainability. Students design complex architectural projects to develop their creative abilities and critical thinking skills. Students are required to present their design solutions to juries comprised of class members and design critics from industry. Design projects may also be submitted to various regional student architectural competitions. This course is intended for students majoring in Architecture and professionals in the field who want to hone their design skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 180A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the third semester of advanced architectural design. Emphasis is placed on issues related to sustainability, materiality, and urban design and context as they relate to building plan, section and form. Students resolve major design problems to further develop their creative abilities and critical thinking skills. Students are required to present their design solutions to juries comprised of members of the class and design critics from industry. This course is intended for students majoring in Architecture and professionals in the field who want to hone their design skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 180B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the fourth semester of advanced architectural design. Emphasis is placed on the application of contemporary architectural theory as the basis for design decisions related to one comprehensive design project. Students are required to present their design solutions to juries comprised of members of the class and design critics from industry. This course is intended for students majoring in Architecture and professionals in the field who want to hone their design skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5; Architecture 155 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a study of the basic principles of design, composition and design process in the creation of urban and community spaces. Emphasis is placed on involving students in real design projects within the community and developing business communication skills. Participation in job shadowing with an industry professional is required. This course is designed for any student interested in environmental design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 7.5 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 100 and Architecture 130, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Architecture 111 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent and Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Description: This course presents methods of construction and drafting practices as applied to architectural construction documents. Students use and apply reference materials and building codes to develop architectural contract documents that include fireplace, door, window, cabinet, and wood stair details for light wood frame and masonry structures. This course is designed for architecture and building construction technology students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level

Description: This course is an introduction to construction cost estimating. Emphasis is placed on determining the amount of work to be done before applying pricing rules. Topics include basic quantity takeoffs, pricing, appropriate markups, overhead, and specification review. This course is intended for students majoring in Architecture and Building Construction Technology. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
6 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a practical study in the development of architectural presentation drawing. Various media may include, but are not limited to, pencil, pen and ink, 3-dimensional (3-D) constructed models and color rendering techniques. This course is designed for architecture, landscape architecture and interior design majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
6 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 220 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a continuation of Architecture 220. It includes a series of miscellaneous problems designed to develop sketching, drawing and presentation skills as well as the creation of a digital rendering library. Various media may include, but are not limited to, pencil, pen and ink, 3-dimensional (3-D) digital models and color rendering techniques. This course includes an introduction to 3-D modeling and presentation software. This course is designed for architecture, landscape architecture and interior design majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 and English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course examines the theory of contemporary architectural design. Emphasis is placed on comparisons between architectural theory and current practice in the region. Students interview a local architect and present a critique of that architect’s work to the class comparing and contrasting it with the theoretical information presented throughout the semester. This class is designed for architecture majors and anyone interested in architectural theory and practice. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5. Mathematics 46 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M40.

Description: This course is a study of sustainable building design. Students design and present projects with emphasis placed on current sustainable design methods and technologies. This course is designed for students majoring in architecture, landscape architecture or interior design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Architecture 136 and Architecture 155, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a hands-on study of planting design. Emphasis is placed on the application of historical and contemporary design styles to a variety of environmental conditions. Students design plant combinations to achieve a range of aesthetic, architectural and engineering functions. This course is designed for students and professionals interested in garden design, landscape architecture, architecture, and related fields. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 7.5 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Architecture 100 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5 and Mathematics 46 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M40.

Description: This course is a practical study of grading methods and drafting techniques as applied to site design. Topics include legal descriptions, property line layout, grading, cut and fill, roadways, drainage, site details, and related calculations. Students create grading plans to improve site designs. This course is intended for architecture and landscape architecture students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3–9 hours other, 1–3 units Grade Only

Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from the instructor for enrollment.

Description: Designed to deal with current problems and topics of special interest in architecture. AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level W6 and R6.

Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts. Emphasis is placed on the various aesthetic approaches, philosophies and artistic orientations around the world in historical and contemporary perspective. This course is intended for humanities majors and all students interested in art and/or art history. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 109 and Art–Fine Art 111, each with a grade of “C” or better; English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course provides a survey of contemporary art and architecture examining theoretical and cultural influences on art from the late 20th century to present. The course is designed for students interested in contemporary art history, as well as for art majors who are focusing on contemporary design, painting, sculpture or ceramics. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: Women in Art is a survey of art produced by women as well as the representation of women in art from the prehistoric through contemporary period. This course will provide an interdisciplinary overview of art work produced by women artists focusing on the intersection of art, gender and social ideologies. This course will also explore the portrayal of women in art and the manner in which cultural definitions of gender shape women’s aesthetic expression and representation. The course is intended for students interested in art, women’s studies and the humanities. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6; Art–Fine Art 110 and 111, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course provides a survey of modern art and architecture examining theoretical and cultural influences on art from the mid-19th century to mid 20th century. The course is designed for students interested in modern art history, as well as for art majors who are focusing on modern design, painting, sculpture or ceramics. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in western civilization from prehistory through the Gothic period. Emphasis is placed on representative art and architecture from Mesopotamia, Iran, Egypt, the Aegean, Etruscan, Rome and Greece. This course is intended for art majors and all students interested in art history, the humanities and culture. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in western civilization from the Renaissance to the Modern era. Emphasis is placed on representative art and architecture from the Renaissance, Mannerism, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and Modernism eras. This course is intended for art majors and all students interested in art history, the humanities and culture. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ARTH 120.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an introduction to the visual arts produced by selected peoples of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas from the prehistoric to contemporary periods. The topics covered in the course are representative of the art and architecture produced by groups from Africa, Oceania and the Americas emphasizing how art is representative of the cultural, religious, social, or political orientation of each region. This course is designed for art and art history majors and all who are interested in the humanities. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Fine Art (ARTF) 113 and 120 combined: maximum credit, one course.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a history of African art. Emphasis is placed on aesthetics, styles and iconography as they relate to African culture and society. This course is designed for all students interested in art, art history and the humanities. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Fine Art (ARTF) 115 and 120 combined: maximum credit, one course. Fine Art (ARTF) 115 and Black Studies (BLAS) 111 combined: maximum credit, one course.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an introductory survey of Native American art and architecture from the prehistoric period to the present. The course will examine the history of Native American cultures from the West, East, North and Southern regions of the North American Continent as represented in pottery, textiles, wood and stone carving, basket-making, jewelry and performance. This course is intended for art history majors and all students interested in the humanities. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Credit may only be granted for either Art–Fine Art (ARTF) 113 or 115 and 120 combined.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course provides a survey of paintings, sculpture, architecture, and associated fine arts from India, China, Japan, and other countries throughout the Asian continent. It emphasizes the social, religious, and political highlights of each culture and their effects on art forms from prehistoric to modern times. This course is designed not only for art students, but also for those who are interested in history, religion, philosophy, humanities, and cultural enrichment. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Chicano Studies 231.

Description: This course is a survey of Pre-Columbian art and architecture. Emphasis is placed on the styles representative of Mesoamerican and South American groups. This course is intended for art and art history majors, ethnic studies majors, and all students interested in the humanities. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an introduction to two-dimensional space and form. Emphasis is placed on ways of organizing visual space into vivid and coherent images. This course is designed for students beginning a study of art and/or related disciplines. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ARTS 100.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6; Art–Fine Art 150A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is an introductory class in graphic communication which uses the computer as a tool for building and editing images. Students address problems of visual form and organization, but with an emphasis in this course on visual constructions which convey information, and on type and text as graphic components of those constructions. This course would be useful for anyone interested in computer graphic design applications. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Art–Fine Art 150A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to three-dimensional space and form. Emphasis is placed on organizing visual space into valid and coherent structures. This course is designed for students beginning the study of art and/or related disciplines. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ARTS 101.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6; Art–Fine Art 150B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to color theory and application. Emphasis is placed on the physical exploration of various color strategies. This course is intended for painters, designers and all students interested in the use of color. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ARTS 270.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This is an introductory course designed to develop the student’s ability to perceive and translate visual relationships from 3-dimensional (3-D) space into 2-dimensional (2-D) drawings. Emphasis is placed on the use of art theory, basic art elements and compositional strategies to create pictorial space and compose original images based on observation. This course is intended for art majors and all students interested in learning freehand drawing whether or not they have previous art experience. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ARTS 110.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6 and Art–Fine Art 155A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an intermediate course in which students apply art principles and theory to create solutions to particular problems of graphic representation and expression. Emphasis is placed on visual analysis and inquiry in creating pictorial space and applying drawing media. Students are introduced to the use of interdisciplinary art forms and image making and explore New Genres as a means of continued intellectual and artistic development. This course is intended for art and graphic art students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ARTS 205.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course provides theory, instruction, and practical experience in all aspects of design and installation of art exhibitions. This course is also designed to give an overview of the history, functions and operations of art museums. The course is intended for art majors who are interested in exhibiting in galleries, as well as for other students seeking to learn the principles of curating and the functioning of museums. Under the guidance of the instructor, students participate in the installation of three exhibitions per semester. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 161A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: TThis second semester course in Museum Studies provides for more extensive understanding of the theory of exhibit display and additional practical experience in all aspects of installation of art exhibitions. This course is designed to examine in detail the functions and operations of art museums and other arts organizations. The course is intended for students planning to pursue a degree or a career in arts administration. Under the guidance of the instructor, students participate in the installation of three exhibitions per semester, taking increasing responsibility with each installation, including overseeing project designs created in the beginning class. Students develop, curate and install an exhibit of their own choosing as their final project. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
192-216 hours other, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 161B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course provides directed professional experience in an art museum or gallery in the San Diego area. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of skills related to exhibit installation and development of all aspects of an art exhibition. This course is designed for art majors and anyone interested in museum studies. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 155A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6 and Art–Fine Art 150A and Art–Fine Art 152, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to oil and acrylic painting methods and techniques. Emphasis is placed on composition, color, and application of general design principles. A variety of subject matter, such as still-life, landscape, portrait and non-objective subjects, and a variety of stylistic approaches such as cubism, collage, realism and expressionism are explored. This course is designed to develop students’ creative abilities and critical thinking in visual terms. This course is intended for students majoring in art and those who wish to improve their artistic skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 165A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the second semester of introduction to oil and acrylic painting methods and techniques. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of pictorial space, composition, and color. The course is designed to further develop students’ creative abilities and critical thinking through the construction of images designed to address specific pictorial problems and goals. This course is intended for students majoring in art and those who wish to improve their artistic skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 165B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the third semester of introduction to oil and acrylic painting methods and techniques. Emphasis is placed on composition, color, and application of general design principles at a more advanced level of creativity and sophistication. This course is designed to develop students’ creative abilities and critical thinking in visual terms through the use of individual assignments tailored to students’ skills. This course is intended for students majoring in art and those who wish to improve their artistic skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 165C with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the fourth and final semester of introduction to oil and acrylic painting methods and techniques. Emphasis is placed on contemporary methods and theories related to conceptualism and new genre. Students produce large format and mural scale paintings. This course is designed to develop students’ creative abilities and critical thinking in visual terms through the use of individual assignments tailored to students’ skills. This course is intended for students majoring in art and those who wish to improve their artistic skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 150A or Art–Graphic Design 100, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Art–Graphic Design 174A.

Description: This is an interdisciplinary course for art students and others who are interested in book arts. The course emphasizes visual form, physical structure, and expressive potential of the artist-made book, including essential elements, tools, and processes. Students construct books in Western and Asian traditions and use these concepts to create unique forms. This course is cross-listed as Art–Graphic Design (ARTG) 174A. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 150A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to sculptural materials, processes, forms, contexts and content. Emphasis is placed on the basic forms and cultural functions of sculpture (past and present). Students produce sculptural artworks under direct guidance of the instructor. This course is intended for students majoring in art and for all students interested in producing three-dimensional art. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 175A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an intermediate level course in sculptural materials, processes, forms, context and content. Emphasis is placed on articulation of sculptural goals and experimentation with materials and methods. Students plan and produce sculptural artworks based on original concepts. This course is intended for art majors and for all students interested in working in three-dimensional art. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 175B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an advanced study in sculptural materials, processes, context and content. Emphasis is placed on the refinement of conceptual skills in their selection and pursuit of sculptural goals. Students experiment with advanced-level concepts and materials to create original sculptural artworks, including large scale pieces. This course is intended for art majors and for all students interested in working in three-dimensional art. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: The course provides an introduction to art theory and skill training in analogue photographic image making. Photography is taught as a medium for self-expression, visual literacy and artistic inquiry. Emphasis is on the art making process, in which photographic images and concepts are explored within social, historical and aesthetic, contexts. Technical instruction is provided in camera operation and exposure, darkroom procedures for film development, print processing and presentation. This course is intended for students preparing 324 San Diego Mesa College • 2015–2016 Art–Fine Art (ARTF) for a major in art as well as those interested in photographic processes. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6; Art–Fine Art 190 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a study of the emergence of photographic traditions within the context of the social, political, economic and scientific forces that have influenced particular genres in the medium. Emphasis is placed on the interrelation of photography and art and focuses on the evolution of major historical types and schools of image making and their relationship to prevailing cultural concerns. This interpretive analysis of significant developments in photography is structured as a balance of lectures, slide presentations and discussion. The course is designed for photographic art majors and all art students interested in improving their ability to understand and discuss photography’s unique historical, material and narrative potential. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6; Art–Fine Art 190A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course examines principles of art criticism and uses the critical process in conceptualizing and producing photographic images. It explores photographic theory and its application to interpreting and evaluating photographic media. Aesthetic and ethical concerns are presented using historical references and perspectives that allow students to place their own work within the context of contemporary critical issues/concerns. The course examines traditional schools of image making and contemporary thinking and practice as a means to broaden the student’s ability in composition, presentation and use of light. This course is designed for photographic art majors and all art students interested in honing their art criticism and studio skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an introductory level ceramics course in which students design and construct hand-built and wheel-thrown ceramic objects. This course is designed for art majors and all students interested in developing ceramic skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 195A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an intermediate level ceramics course in which students design and construct wheel thrown and hand-built ceramic objects. Emphasis is placed on form and surface enrichment. This course is designed for art majors for students interested in developing ceramic skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 195A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 195B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a study of advanced techniques in clay and glaze formulation, mixing, and testing. Emphasis is placed on the physical and chemical nature of ceramic materials and how they affect glaze fired surface results. This course in intended for students majoring in art and anyone interested in ceramics. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
Art–Fine Art 195A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Prerequisite: Art - Fine Art 195A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6. This course provides instruction in the design and construction of hand built ceramic forms. Students create ceramic objects emphasizing form and surface enrichment, while gaining experience applying glazes and loading kilns. This course is designed for art majors and for students interested in developing ceramic skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 197A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This is an advanced level ceramics course in which students design and construct hand-built ceramic forms. Emphasis is placed on form and surface enrichment, weighing, mixing and use of glazes, and loading and firing electric kilns. This course is designed for art majors and for students interested in developing ceramic skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 150A and Art–Fine Art 155A, each with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent and English 101, with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an introduction to the basic printmaking media of intaglio, relief, and monoprinting. Emphasis is placed on the techniques for creating and printing plates. Students investigate papers, select for properties, analyze aesthetic strategies for image making, and practice the principles of editioning and print conservation. This course is designed for art majors and all students interested in printmaking. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 198A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the second semester in basic printmaking media. Emphasis is placed on increasingly complex processes, such as photo intaglio, collagraph, and reduction color relief. Students apply aesthetic criteria in analyzing their creative choices and examine contemporary printmaking in world cultures. This course is designed for art and art history majors and all students interested in printmaking. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 198B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the third semester in printmaking media. Emphasis is placed on the development of a personal visual language through the application of advanced print processes, such as multiple-plate intaglio, double drop printing, mezzotint, and white ground. Students experiment with combining print processes to create a cohesive body of artwork for presentation. This course is designed for art and art history majors and all students interested in printmaking. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 190A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an advanced study of the theory and practice of black and white photographic image making. Emphasis is placed on increasing students’ visual literacy with black and white photography from both technical and conceptual perspectives. Topics include composition, creative control of materials, light logic and advanced photographic theory. This course is intended for art majors and all those interested in increasing their competency in photographic image making, exploring new methodologies and producing gallery-level art work. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 150A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to concept-based New Genres art practices. Emphasis is placed on the intersection of form/medium and concept as well as on the role of art in contemporary culture. Students develop concepts based on issues related to social commentary, political action, institutional critique, community involvement and personal identity and experiment with forms, such as installation, performance, technological, hybrid and emerging art forms. This course is designed for art majors and anyone interested in contemporary art practices. (FT) AA/AS; CSU, UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 155A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 150A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent; English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This is a basic course in drawing the human form as a sequence of studies from live models. Accurate and expressive translations of the mass as two-dimensional drawings are refined in a variety of achromatic media. This course is designed for students who are majoring in fine art and is also a relevant foundation for those that are interested in disciplines that use the human form such as animation and fashion design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID ARTS 200.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 210A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an intermediate course in drawing the human form as a sequence of studies from live models. Students work with color and experiment with concepts related to figure drawing. This course is designed for students who are majoring in fine art and is also a relevant foundation for those that are interested in disciplines that use the human form such as animation and fashion design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 210B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is an advanced course in drawing the human form as a sequence of studies from live models. Students work closely with the instructor to develop, create and present original artwork. This course is designed for students who are majoring in fine art. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
32–36 hours lecture, 64–71 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 150A and Art–Fine Art 151, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is an introduction to the naturalistic and dynamic representation of the human body. Students sculpt from observation of live, nude models in poses of extended duration. In the process, students come to understand seeing as a learned skill. This course is intended for transfer students planning to major in art and for all students interested in the problems inherent in representing what they see. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
32–36 hours lecture, 64–71 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art–Fine Art 220A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course continues the introduction to naturalistic and dynamic representation of the human body, done from observation of live models in poses of extended duration. This course is intended for transfer students planning to major in art and for all students interested in developing skills of naturalistic representation. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
32–36 hours lecture, 64–71 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Art - Fine Art 220B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: In this course students learn to extend their skill in representing the human figure convincingly in three dimensions (developed in Art 220A and Art 220B) to naturalistic representation in more than one style. This course is intended for transfer students planning to major in art and for all students interested in developing sophisticated skills of naturalistic representation. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 150A and Art–Fine Art 155A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in Multimedia 101 or Art–Fine Art 150B, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course provides an overview of digital art strategies and practices and their relationship to traditional fine art practices. Emphasis is placed on the development of computer technology and its impact on contemporary art since the 1960s. Discussions and studio assignments encompass digital imaging strategies, software art, teleconference art, interactive art, immersive installation art, web art/distance art and activism. Motion-based media such as digital animation, and digital video are also discussed. This course is designed for students interested in digital art. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 231 or 150A, 155A and 165A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in Multimedia 101 or Art–Fine Art 150B, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course provides an overview of digital art strategies and practices and their relationship to traditional fine art drawing and painting. Students produce digital drawings and paintings using digital raster and vector based applications to creatively replicate and expand traditional drawing and painting media. Students extend and explore the hand drawn mark and painted surface in the digital realm. This course is designed for fine art and multimedia students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 190A, 231 and 150A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in Multimedia 101 or Art–Fine Art 150B, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course provides an overview of digital photographic art strategies and practices and their relationship to traditional photographic fine art practices. Emphasis is placed on the digital camera, digital photo image processing, digital photomontage, and mixed media compositions. The students are introduced to the manipulation and production of digital image compositions using software applications such as Adobe Photoshop to extend traditional photographic art strategies. This course is designed for fine art and multimedia students. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Art–Fine Art 155B, Art–Fine Art 165D, Art–Fine Art 175C, Art–Fine Art 200, Art–Fine Art 197B, Art–Fine Art 198C or Art–Fine Art 232, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is intended for advanced art students. Students enrolled in this course work closely with the instructor to develop a transfer portfolio, artist statement, curatorial concept and/or resume exhibition list. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Pass/No Pass

Corequisite: Art–Fine Art 150A, 152, 155A, 155B, 165A, 165B, 165C, 165D, 174A, 198A , 198B, 198C , 210A , 210B or 210C.

Description: This course is a supervised studio laboratory in 2-dimensional media. Emphasis is placed on technical refinement of personal drawing and painting skills. This course is designed for fine art majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Pass/No Pass

Corequisite: Art–Fine Art 151, 175A, 205A, 220A, 220B or 220C.

Description: This course is a supervised studio laboratory in 3-dimensional media. Emphasis is placed on technical refinement of fabrication skills specific to the various media explorations presented in the accompanying courses. This course is designed for fine art majors. AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Pass/No Pass

Corequisite: Art - Fine Art 195A, 195B, 197A or 197B.

Description: Corequisite: Art–Fine Art 195A, 195B, 197A or 197B. This course is a supervised studio laboratory in ceramics. Emphasis is placed on technical refinement of personal ceramic skills. This course is designed for fine arts majors. This course may be taken four times for credit. Students must demonstrate increased proficiency with each repetition. AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Pass/No Pass

Corequisite: Art–Fine Art 231, 232 or 233.

Description: This is a supervised studio laboratory in digital art and graphic design. Emphasis is placed on the technical refinement of digital imaging skills. This course is designed for fine art majors. AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Pass/No Pass

Corequisite: Art - Fine Art 161A, 161B or 163.

Description: This course is a supervised studio laboratory in digital support for Museum Studies. Emphasis is placed on the exploration and refinement of technical skills specific to the creation of digital documents that support museum and art exhibits. This course is designed for fine art majors. AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Pass/No Pass

Corequisite: Art–Fine Art 190A, 194 or 200.

Description: This course is a supervised studio laboratory for students concurrently enrolled in Art Department Photography classes. Emphasis is placed on the refinement of students’ photographic and visual development in film processing, printing, studio work and print finishing. This course is designed for fine art majors. AA/AS; CSU.
Hours by Arrangement, 1-3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from instructor for registration. Requires consent of the department.

Description: Open only to those students who have exhausted departmental offerings in their areas of emphasis. (FT) AA/AS; CSU. This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.

An interdisciplinary approach (See selected courses in English, page 394, History, page 446, Language Arts and Humanities, page 236, Music, page 477, and Philosophy, page 493)

An interdisciplinary approach (See selected courses in History, page 446)

3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48, English 49 and Mathematics 34A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5, W5 and M20.

Description: This course is an introductory survey of contemporary astronomy. Topics covered include the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, the Milky Way galaxy and cosmology. This course is designed for students planning to take advanced courses in the physical and earth sciences and for transfer students planning to major in astronomy. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Astronomy 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is a laboratory field experience course in general astronomy. Emphasis is placed on the constellations, celestial cycle interpretation, and descriptive observations of astronomical objects and events with and without the use of telescopes. This course is for all students interested in field experience in general astronomy. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Astronomy (ASTR) 109 and 111 combined: maximum credit, one course.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in: Astronomy 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: University of California Applicable This laboratory course features exercises and experiments covering topics ranging across the spectrum of astronomy. The course deals with the foundations of astronomy, and may include telescopes, planetary astronomy, stellar astronomy and galactic astronomy. Indoor exercises may involve computer simulations. Outdoor exercises may be required. The course is designed to supplement Astronomy 101. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Astronomy (ASTR) 109 and 111 combined: maximum credit, one course. This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of ecology. Emphasis is placed on the biological systems and plants and animals of Southern California through lecture, laboratory and field trips. Topics include the nature of the physical environment, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, evolution and biodiversity, species interactions, and human impacts on natural systems. This course is intended for students interested in environmental biology. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Biology (BIOL) 100 and 120 combined: maximum credit, one course.
3 hours lecture, 3 hour lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6 or English 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent; Mathematics 46 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M40.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Biology 105, Biology 106, Biology 210A, or Biology 210B.

Description: This course is an examination of living organisms and their environment. The lecture and laboratory are intended for students planning on taking more advanced courses in the Life Sciences, or students majoring in Education, Child Development, Physiological Psychology or related areas. Topics include the fundamental chemical and physical processes common to all living organisms, the interactions between organisms and their environment, classical and molecular genetics, metabolism, plant and animal anatomy and physiology, animal behavior, evolution, cellular and molecular biology, and the experimental and cognitive processes used to examine these fields. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: No credit for Biology (BIOL) 105, 106 or 107 if taken after 210A, 210B.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a survey of physical, chemical, geological, and biological oceanography. This course is designed for all students interested in marine science. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a study of marine biology. Emphasis is placed on marine organisms, their natural history and special adaptations to the ocean environment. Topics include the marine environment, plankton, marine plants, marine invertebrates, fishes, marine birds, marine reptiles, and marine mammals. Students participate in several field trips to local marine habitats and museums. This course is intended for all students interested in marine biology. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This is an introductory course that examines the immediate and long-range causes and effects of air, water, and land pollution on the environment and human health. The course also explores basic concepts of ecology, overpopulation, natural resources, and the sustainability of the environment and its biodiversity. The study of positive solutions to the ecological dilemma is addressed. This course is designed for general students interested in the environment and for those students majoring in environmental sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Biology (BIOL) 100 and 120 combined: maximum credit, one course.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of human heredity. It deals with both classical Mendelian genetics and modern molecular genetics. Topics include gamete formation, human karyotypes, genetic crosses, sex-linked inheritance, structure and function of DNA and RNA, gene expression, transcription and translation, genetic engineering, and population genetics. This course is designed for students interested in biology and human heredity. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Biology 230 or 235.

Description: This course is an introduction to the structure and functions of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the human body systems including the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, reproductive, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, excretory, and digestive systems. This course is designed for students preparing for allied health occupations such as radiological technician, physical therapist assistant, and medical laboratory technician, as well as students interested in learning about the human body. AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This is an introductory course that examines the interdependence of humans and plants. This course is intended for all that want to learn about the uses of plants, especially those students with an interest in biology, anthropology, environmental sciences, and/or agriculture. Emphasis is on plant ecology as well as the basic biology of plant groups that provide us with food, medicine, recreation, decoration, and material goods as well as those that produce stimulating, intoxicating, or harmful effects. Basic principles of taxonomy, cell structure, plant physiology, plant anatomy, ecology and genetics are explored as they relate to these plants. Current environmental and economic issues and the role of molecular genetics in future plant development and the importance of genetic diversity are also examined. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Credit will only be granted for either Biology (BIOL) 180 or 215 and 250 combined. No credit for Biology (BIOL) 180, 215 or 250 if taken after 210A or 210B.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Biology 107 or Biology 210A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent and Mathematics 116 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6 or English 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Biology 107, Biology 210A and Mathematics 116 completed within five years of enrollment in Biology 200.

Description: This is an introductory course in statistics using biological examples and experimental design. Students learn methods and gain experience in defining and solving quantitative problems in biology. Descriptive and inferential statistics, basic probability, binomial and normal distributions are introduced. Students learn to estimate population parameters, test hypotheses, linear regression and correlation using clinical and biological data and experiments. This course is intended for students majoring in biological science. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Mathematics (MATH) 119, Biology (BIOL) 200 or Physics (PHYS) 258 combined: maximum credit, one course; C-ID SOCI 125.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Biology 107 and Chemistry 100 and 100L or Chemistry 152 and 152L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This introductory course covers fundamental aspects of microbiology including taxonomy, structure, physiology, reproduction, genetics, control, immunology, diversity, and host-symbiont relationships. Lab work emphasizes basic techniques for culturing, staining, counting, and identifying microorganisms. This course is intended for students pursuing careers in allied health fields and may meet entry requirements for these allied health fields. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Chemistry 152 and Chemistry 152L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent completed within five years of enrollment in BIOL 210A and Mathematics 96 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M50 completed within five years of enrollment in BIOL 210A.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 200 and Chemistry 200L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course covers biological chemistry, cell structure and function, cellular metabolism, classical and molecular genetics, and the molecular basis of evolutionary biology. This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence designed for biological science and pre-professional majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Biology 210A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Description: This course covers the three Domains of life, including the phylogenetic relationships of major groups of organisms. Topics include adaptive radiation, anatomy, physiology, development, behavior, and ecology. This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence designed for biological science and pre-professional majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 4 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Biology 107 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 48 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Level R5.

Description: This is an introductory course that surveys the basic principles of animal biology. These principles include morphology, life processes and evolutionary relationships of the invertebrates and vertebrates. Laboratories include the identification of organisms, dissection and recognition of the anatomy of varied animal representatives, embryological development, histology, behavior and physiology. This course is intended for students majoring in Biological Science, Allied Health and Animal Science. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Credit will only be granted for either Biology (BIOL) 180 or 215 and 250 combined. No credit for Biology (BIOL) 180, 215 or 250 if taken after 210A or 210B.
2 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Biology 107, 160 or 210A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a systems approach to the study of human body structure from the microscopic level of organization to the gross level. Students relate body structures to their functions by studying histological slides and photomicrographs, anatomical models and charts, and mammalian dissection that may include using prosector cadavers for studying and testing. This course is intended to meet the requirements of students in the fields of nursing, physical therapy, recreational therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, chiropractic, psychology, physical education, and biology or those who wish to extend their knowledge of the human body beyond the scope of introductory biology. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID BIOL 110B.
1 hour lecture, 1 unit Pass/No Pass

Corequisite: Biology 230.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is self-paced study of anatomy through the use of computer software, microscope slides, anatomical models, and graphics. This course is intended to meet the requirements of students in the fields of nursing, physical therapy, recreational therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, chiropractic, psychology, physical education, and biology or those who wish to extend their knowledge of the human body beyond the scope of introductory biology. AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Biology 230 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Biology 230 completed within five years of enrollment in Biology 232. Preregistration counseling with instructor is highly recommended.

Description: This course provides a supervised study and actual experience in human dissection. Topics include dissection techniques and human anatomy. This course is intended for students pursuing careers in nursing, medicine, and other allied health professions. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Biology 107 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Biology 230, Chemistry 100 and Chemistry 100L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introductory study of human body functions. Emphasis is placed on the nervous, endocrine, muscular, cardiovascular, immune, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems. This course is intended for students majoring in nursing, allied health, psychology, biology and physical education. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 4 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of the anatomy, development, physiology, reproductive biology, genetics, ecology and evolution of the major plant groups, with emphasis on the flowering plants. The course is targeted towards students with no previous college level biology, but is also appropriate as a lower division course for biology majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Credit will only be granted for either Biology (BIOL) 180 or 215 and 250 combined. No credit for Biology (BIOL) 180, 215 or 250 if taken after 210A or 210B.
3–9 hours other, 1–3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from the instructor for enrollment.

Description: A student may sign up for 1 to 3 units each semester for a maximum of 6 units. For advanced students in biology who wish to continue with a special investigation. The course consists of individualized research problems, conferences with the instructor at prearranged intervals and a final report on the work completed. This course may be taken four times with different content for a maximum of six units. AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
33 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an overview of the Black Studies discipline including its social and academic origins, goals and development. Emphasis is placed on providing students with an understanding of the fundamental areas of study within the field and of the interdisciplinary approach to studying the African experience in America and the world. This course is intended for students majoring in Black Studies and all students interested in general knowledge of the Black experience. AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an introduction to psychological concepts and principles as they relate to African American behaviors, perspectives and lifestyles. Emphasis is placed on comparing Euro-American theories as they have been traditionally applied to African Americans with contemporary Afri-centric theories and the ways in which they may be applied to create a greater understanding of the behaviors, lifestyles and psychological needs of African Americans. This course is intended for students majoring in Black Studies and all students interested in the multicultural aspects of psychology. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Psychology (PSYC) 101 and Black Studies (BLAS) 104 combined: maximum credit, one course.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a historical survey of African American art from 1650 to present, including the influence of African, European and Native American art styles and traditions. This course is intended for students majoring in Black Studies, Art and those who are interested in history, humanities, teaching, travel, and cultural enrichment. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of the cultural influences on African art and architecture from the prehistoric period to present. Emphasis is placed on cultural practices that utilize art objects in the form of ritual, oral history and performance. This course is designed for all students interested in the cultural history of Africa in relation art, art history and the humanities. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Black Studies (BLAS) 111 and Art–Fine Art (ARTF) 115 combined: maximum credit, one course..
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 or English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 or W5.

Description: This course is a sociological analysis of institutional racism, the process of social change and how it affects African Americans. Emphasis is placed on broad contemporary issues as they relate to African Americans, such as the prison industrial complex, gender and health care. This course is intended for Black Studies majors and anyone interested in history, teaching and current events. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a study of African American musical forms and styles in historical perspective. Emphasis is placed on providing students with an appreciation for the African roots of a variety of African American music genres. This course is intended for students majoring in Black Studies and anyone interested in the history of African American music. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an introduction to the varying dynamics of the Black community. Emphasis is placed on creating an appreciation for the Black community’s unique attributes, resources, and contributions to the larger community. Students visit Black community organizations, institutions and/or businesses to identify a critical need and to develop a corresponding action plan. This course is intended for students majoring in Black Studies and all students interested in understanding the dynamics of the Black community. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a study of the African American family. Emphasis is placed on the socio-cultural and psychological issues surrounding the history of the Black family in America. Topics include contemporary African American dating, marriage and divorce patterns, gender roles and extended family, kin and community networks. This course is intended for students majoring in Black Studies and all students interested in the historical and contemporary perspective of the Black family. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of United States History from the Colonial period to 1877 with emphasis on African American experiences and contributions. Course content focuses on political, social, economic, and cultural development of the country. This course is intended for all students interested in the history of the U.S. from an African American perspective. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: History (HIST) 109-110, 141-142, 150-151, Black Studies (BLAS) 140A-140B, and/or Chicano Studies (CHIC) 141A-141B combined: maximum credit, one series.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on African American experience and contributions. Course content focuses on political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual trends, the persistence of racism, and the struggle for full equality for all Americans. This course is intended for all students interested in the history of the U.S. from an African American perspective. AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: History (HIST) 109-110, 141-142, 150-151, Black Studies (BLAS) 140A-140B, and/or Chicano Studies (CHIC) 141A-141B combined: maximum credit, one series.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Description: This course is a survey of African History from the Stone Age through the beginnings of European colonization in the 1870s. Emphasis is placed on providing students with a broad presentation of the geographical features of the continent and its connections to the rest of the world, local and regional cultural, political, economic and social institutions, slavery, European conquest and colonization, and African resistance to colonization. This course is intended for students majoring in black studies or history and for all students interested in African history. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course analyzes stereotypical, contemporary and self images of Africana women in literature, film and media. This course is designed for Black Studies majors and all students interested in literature, film and media. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of African American cultural expression through language and literature in historical perspective. Emphasis is placed on the cultural, ethnic, and political dynamics that influence literary, musical and theoretical texts. Topics include African praise songs, slave narratives, African American folktales, poetry, lyrics, spirituals, raps, short stories, novels, speeches and essays. This course is for students majoring in Black Studies and all students interested in literature from an African American perspective. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Black Studies 265

Description: This course is intended for students majoring in Black Studies and all students interested in sexuality and the African-American community. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Psychology (PSYC) 137 and Black Studies (BLAS) 165 combined: maximum credit, one course.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an analytical study of the historical and psychological impact of racism and sexism on people in American society and culture. Emphasis is placed on the impact of racism and sexism on human relations in America. This course is intended for students majoring in Black Studies and all students interested in addressing issues related to racism and sexism. AA/AS; CSU; UC.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
Class sections of the following courses utilize a variety of reading and/or research materials from a Black perspective. See page 394 for complete English course descriptions and page 354 for complete Communications Studies course descriptions. Refer to the class schedule under the particular subject listing for designated sections.
English

43 English Review
49 Basic Composition (no longer degree applicable)
101 Reading and Composition
105 Composition and Literature
205 Critical Thinking and Intermediate Composition
Communications Studies

103 Oral Communication
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Building Construction Technology 120.

Description: This course is a practical study of the use and interpretation of construction plans. Students extract construction requirements from building plans and specifications to obtain information needed to install and direct construction, perform building inspections, prepare estimates, perform appraisals, and maintain buildings. This course is intended for students in Architecture, Interior Design, or Building Construction Technology programs and others who are pursuing careers in these fields. (FT) AA/AS.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Building Construction Technology 130.

Description: This course provides instruction and hands-on experience related to the practical application of basic framing and layout techniques commonly used in residential and commercial light framing. It is intended for students in Building Construction Technology and Architecture as well as trade practitioners or others pursuing a career in the construction industry. (FT) AA/AS.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Building Construction Technology 170.

Description: This course is a practical study of building practices. Emphasis is placed on basic carpentry and finish techniques as well as the integration of plumbing and electrical systems in residential buildings. Topics include coordinating with other trades, building codes and required regulatory inspections. This course is intended for students in the construction management or inspection programs and anyone interested in residential construction practices. (FT) AA/AS.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Architecture 130, Building Construction Technology 68, and 70, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Building Construction Technology 245.

Description: This class provides students with the skills required to apply the structural and architectural prescriptive requirements of the California Building Code and zoning regulations for design, construction, and inspection of buildings and other fixed works. This course is intended for students in Architecture, Interior Design, and Building Construction Technology, as well as for inspectors, contractors, persons seeking ICC inspection certifications, and construction quality control/assurance personnel. (FT) AA/AS.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Building Construction Technology 268.

Description: This course is a practical study of the application and interpretation of the California Electrical Code, the California Plumbing Code, the California Mechanical Code, and their relation to other California building codes and their source model codes. This course is designed for students in Architecture, Interior Design, Building Construction Technology, designers, inspectors, contractors, trades people and others interested in building codes. (FT) AA/AS.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Building Construction Technology 260.

Description: This course provides students, design professionals, inspectors, appraisers, and construction trade persons with the skills to locate and apply California Building Code (CBC) and local zoning regulations. Emphasis is placed on building design, plan review, and fire and life safety issues. This course is intended for students in Architecture, Building Construction Technology, Interior Design, and inspectors, San Diego Mesa College • 2015–2016 337 Business (BUSE) AA/AS = Associate Degree Applicable CSU = California State University Applicable UC = University of California Applicable plancheckers, contractors and others with an interest in the application of California Building Code provisions. (FT) AA/AS.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Building Construction Technology 250.

Description: This course is a practical study of construction project management. Emphasis is placed on Project Management Institute vocabulary and methodology. Topics include contract terms and conditions within the context of project scope management, project time management, project cost management, project quality management, project resource management, project communications management, project risk management, and project procurement management while satisfying project deliverables. This course is designed for students in Architecture, Building Construction Management, superintendents, and others with an interest in project management. (FT) AA/AS.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Advisory: Building Construction Technology 75 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Building Construction Technology 255.

Description: This course is a practical study of construction project management and scheduling. Emphasis is placed on the vocabulary, technology, tools and techniques, risks, and contractual issues related to the development, acceptance, execution, monitoring, and modification of project schedules as they relate to stakeholders and project deliverables. This course is intended for students in Architecture and Construction Management as well as contractors, subcontractors superintendents and others with an interest in project management and scheduling. (FT) AA/AS.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Building Construction Technology 295.

Description: This course provides students with the knowledge and skills required to apply the rules and regulations governing construction contracting in California. Emphasis is placed on preparing students to sit for the License Law portion of the various Contractor’s License exams administered by the California Contractor’s State License Board. This course is intended for students in the Architecture, Interior Design, and Building Construction Technology programs and persons planning on taking the contractor’s license examination or who are interested in utilizing construction contracting services. (FT) AA/AS.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 288. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: Advisory: Business 92 or English 42 and English 43, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R4 and W4.

Description: This introductory course for both business and nonbusiness majors provides a broad understanding of the business community, including how culture; society; economic systems; legal, international, political, and financial institutions; and human behavior interact to affect a business organization’s policy and practices within the U.S. and a global society. Topics include business functions and terminology; organizational structure and design; leadership; human resource management; organized labor practices; marketing; organizational communication; technology; entrepreneurship; legal, accounting, and financial practices; the stock and securities market; and occupational choices. This course is intended for students majoring in Business or anyone interested in the function and role of the business community. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 42 and English 43, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R4 and W4; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Description: This course provides a comprehensive study of business mathematics and reviews basic mathematics such as decimals, fractions, and percentages. Topics include bank services; payroll; the mathematics of buying and selling; interest and loans, taxes; insurance; depreciation; and other business computations. This course is intended for students majoring in business or others who work or intend to work in a business setting such as managers, supervisors, or work team members. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Mathematics 92 or Mathematics 96, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels M45 or M50.

Description: This course is a study of statistical analysis. Emphasis is placed on the use of descriptive statistics, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and regression and correlation analyses as aids for business decision making. This course is designed for students majoring in business or economics. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and

Description: This course applies the principles of effective and ethical communication to the creation of letters; memos; emails; and written and oral reports for a variety of business situations. The course emphasizes the development, analysis, organization, and composition of various types of professionallevel written messages, analytical reports, and business presentations using word processing and presentation-graphics software. Other topics include interpersonal communication, electronic media, and international/cross-cultural communication. This course is intended for students majoring in business and for others working in a business environment. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; C-ID BUS 115.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5 or Business 92 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course introduces students to the legal system, the laws that govern business in America, and the principles underlying fundamental legal concepts. Topics include judicial and administrative systems; ethics; contracts; torts; bankruptcy; agency; business organizations and ownership types; government agencies and regulation; protection of intellectual property interest; and the international business environment. This course is intended for students majoring in business and for others interested in business law. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID BUS 120, BUS 125.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course introduces students to human behavior as it relates to business. Topics include leadership, communication, status, decision making, motivation, and personnel problems. This course is intended for students majoring in business and others who work or intend to work in a business setting such as San Diego Mesa College • 2015–2016 339 Chemistry (CHEM) AA/AS = Associate Degree Applicable CSU = California State University Applicable UC = University of California Applicable managers, supervisors, and work team members. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49 and Mathematics 38, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5, W5 and M30; Business 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a study of the elements involved in successfully operating a small business. Key issues include human resource management, marketing for small business, and legal issues. This course is intended for the student who plans to major in Business Studies or Business Management. This course is also intended for students from any discipline who are interested in owning or operating a small business. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course covers business organization and management fundamentals. Topics include business planning, leadership, productivity, managerial ethics, and corporate social responsibility. This course is intended for students majoring in business and for others who work or intend to work in a business setting such as managers and supervisors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Mathematics 46 or 92, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels M40 or M45.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 100L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 200 or 152.

Description: This course is an introductory study of the language and tools of chemistry. Basic concepts of the structure, properties, interactions of matter and energy are studied, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Emphasis is placed on matter, chemical changes, chemical conversions, chemical bonding, and acid-base chemistry. This course is intended for students majoring in nursing, nutrition, or animal health technology and provides a foundation for further coursework in chemistry, in particular for introductory organic chemistry. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 100, 100L, 111, 111L and 152, 152L combined: maximum credit, four units. No credit will be given for 100, 100L, 111, 111L or 152, 152L if taken after CHEM 200.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Mathematics 46 or 92, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels M40 or M45.

Corequisite: Chemistry 100.

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This laboratory course is designed to illustrate the principles of inorganic and physical chemistry and to familiarize students with scientific reasoning, basic laboratory equipment and safe practices, scientific data collection methods and interpretation. This laboratory course is intended for students majoring in nursing, nutrition and allied health sciences, and provides a foundation for future lab work in chemistry. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 100, 100L, 111, 111L and 152, 152L combined: maximum credit, four units. No credit will be given for 100, 100L, 111, 111L or 152, 152L if taken after CHEM 200.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Chemistry 111L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is an introductory chemistry course for nonscience majors. The course emphasizes conceptual topics in chemistry and scientific thinking. Students learn to understand how society uses chemistrybased technologies and how to analyze current trends or news involving chemistry. Topics include a basic understanding of matter and energy, physical and chemical changes, the atom, nuclear chemistry, bonding, acids and bases, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. Current issues in environmental chemistry such as energy resources, air and water pollution are explored. Students discuss the effects and controversy surrounding the use of different forms of energy. In addition, current issues in organic and biochemistry are examined including trends in diets, certain medicines and drugs, and personal care items. Students planning on taking further courses in chemistry should take Chemistry 100 or Chemistry 152. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 100, 100L, 111, 111L and 152, 152L combined: maximum credit, four units. No credit will be given for 100, 100L, 111, 111L or 152, 152L if taken after CHEM 200.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in: Chemistry 111 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This laboratory course is intended for non-science majors. It is designed to illustrate the principles of chemistry presented in Chemistry 111 in order for the student to understand how chemistry is used in our society. Experiments explore not only basic concepts in chemistry such as matter, energy, and the atom, but also explore real world applications of chemistry. This includes performing experiments related to the chemistry of the environment, household products, and biochemistry. Students learn how to work safely within the laboratory. Students that need to take further chemistry courses should enroll in Chemistry 152L or Chemistry 100L. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 100, 100L, 111, 111L and 152, 152L combined: maximum credit, four units. No credit will be given for 100, 100L, 111, 111L or 152, 152L if taken after CHEM 200.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 100 and 100L, or Chemistry 152 and 152L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 130L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is a one-semester course that introduces the basic physical, chemical and structural features of organic and biological compounds. Topics such as bonding, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, the chemistry of organic functional groups, and the properties of important biological compounds such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins are covered. The importance of these compounds in our daily lives is emphasized. This course is designed for nursing, nutrition, and allied health majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 130, 130L and 231, 231L combined: maximum credit, one course (with lab).
3 hours lab, 1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 100 and 100L, or Chemistry 152 and 152L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 130 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is a one-semester laboratory course that illustrates the principles presented in Chemistry 130. Students are introduced to common organic chemistry laboratory equipment, fundamental organic and biochemical reactions, tests and techniques. Techniques covered include chromatography, recrystallization, and distillation. Tests and reactions of common organic functional groups, carbohydrates, fats, and amino acids are covered. Synthesis of a medicinal compound such as aspirin or a nitrogen-based analgesic is also covered. This course is designed for nursing, nutrition, and allied health majors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 130, 130L and 231, 231L combined: maximum credit, one course (with lab).
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Mathematics 96 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M50.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 152L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Chemistry 151.

Description: This is a one-semester preparatory course in chemistry consisting of an intensive study of the principles of inorganic and physical chemistry in preparation for General Chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, chemical nomenclature, periodicity, chemical equations, stoichiometry, solutions, and gas laws. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and chemical calculations. This course is intended for those students majoring in one of the natural sciences, engineering, or related curricula who need to take General Chemistry. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 100, 100L, 111, 111L and 152, 152L combined: maximum credit, four units. No credit will be given for 100, 100L, 111, 111L or 152, 152L if taken after CHEM 200.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Mathematics 96 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M50.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 152 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Chemistry 151.

Description: This course is a one-semester laboratory in the principles of inorganic and physical chemistry in preparation for General Chemistry. Topics include chemical measurement, significant figures, laboratory safety, laboratory techniques, chemical reactions and stoichiometry. Emphasis is placed on problem solving, data analysis and chemical calculations. This course is intended for students majoring in one of the natural sciences, engineering or related curricula who need to take General Chemistry. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 100, 100L, 111, 111L and 152, 152L combined: maximum credit, four units. No credit will be given for 100, 100L, 111, 111L or 152, 152L if taken after CHEM 200.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Chemistry 130 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to the chemistry of biochemical reactions and biochemical molecules. Topics include acid/base chemistry, thermodynamics, cell biology, amino acids and proteins, enzymes, lipids, membranes and transport, carbohydrates, metabolism, nucleic acids and information transfer. This course is designed for students majoring in nutrition, allied health, nursing, and the chemical or life sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
Chemistry 100L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 100L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Biology 205 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Biology 132.

Description: This course is designed to provide students with both theoretical and applied knowledge of currently useful biochemical and biotechnical methods. Experiments provide experiences in mammalian tissue culture; protein and/or enzyme analyses; immunological analyses; computer-assisted applications and bioinformatics. This course is designed for students in the chemistry technician program or those seeking experiences necessary for employment in the biopharmaceutical industry. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Mathematics 96 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M50; Chemistry 152 and Chemistry 152L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 200L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is the first course in a two course sequence in general chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the principles and laws of inorganic chemistry, including quantitative, mathematical problem-solving. Topics include chemical equations, stoichiometry, atomic theory, and its relationship to periodicity of the elements, bonding theories, molecular geometry, solution chemistry, liquids, solids, and the gas laws. This course is intended for science majors and all students interested in chemistry. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID CHEM 110; C-ID CHEM 120S (CHEM 200, 200L, 201, 201L).
6 hours lab, 2 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite:: Chemistry 152 and Chemistry 152L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent; Mathematics 96 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M50.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 200 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is the first semester laboratory course in a two course sequence in general chemistry. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiments that illustrate the fundamental principles and laws of chemical behavior and the properties of matter, including quantitative, mathematical problem-solving. Topics include techniques of data analysis, chemical formulas, equations, stoichiometry and maintenance of a laboratory notebook. This course is intended for science majors and all students interested in chemistry. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID CHEM 110; C-ID CHEM 120S (CHEM 200, 200L, 201, 201L).
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 200 and Chemistry 200L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent; Mathematics 96 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M50.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 201L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the second course in a two course sequence in general chemistry and is intended for students majoring in science or satisfying prerequisites for professional schools. The course covers the principles of physical and inorganic chemistry with an emphasis on quantitative, mathematical problem solving. Topics in the course include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base theory, thermochemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry and nuclear chemistry. The course also includes an introduction to organic chemistry. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID CHEM 120S (CHEM 200, 200L, 201, 201L).
6 hours lab, 2 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 200 and Chemistry 200L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent; Mathematics 96 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M50.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 201 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is the second semester laboratory course of a two course sequence in general chemistry. It is intended for students majoring in science or satisfying prerequisites for professional schools. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles of physical and inorganic chemistry. Topics include techniques of data analysis, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids, bases, and salts, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry. Computer skills are introduced and applied to data analysis, laboratory simulations, and computer interfacing with laboratory equipment. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID CHEM 120S (CHEM 200, 200L, 201, 201L).
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 201 and Chemistry 201L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 231L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6 or English 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the first semester of a one-year course in Organic Chemistry. Major themes include, but are not limited to, bonding, molecular structure, isomerism, conformational analysis, nomenclature, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis. An emphasis is placed on the reactions of aliphatic compounds such as alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, and alcohols. The organic chemistry literature, and spectral interpretation using techniques such as infrared and nuclear magnetic spectroscopies, are introduced to support the above topics. This course is designed for undergraduates pursuing a degree in the chemical sciences, training in chemical technology, and other transfer students who need organic chemistry as part of the formal preparation for their major; for example, molecular biology, premedical, predental, and pharmacy. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 130, 130L and 231, 231L combined: maximum credit, one course (with lab).
6 hours lab, 2 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 201 and Chemistry 201L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 231 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 105 or English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels W6 and R6.

Description: This is a laboratory course designed to illustrate the principles presented in Chemistry 231. The emphasis is on the determination of physical properties and the separation, purification and identification of organic compounds. The course acquaints students with the equipment, glassware, techniques and safe practices specific to the organic chemistry laboratory. Techniques such as measurement of physical constants, recrystallization, extraction, distillation and chromatography are used in the synthesis and/or characterization of selected classes of organic compounds. These classes include, but are not limited to, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, and alcohols. The organic chemistry literature and spectral interpretation using techniques such as infrared and nuclear spectroscopies, are introduced to support the above topics. This course is designed for undergraduates pursuing a degree in the chemical sciences, training in chemical technology, and those students who need organic chemistry as part of the formal preparation for their major; for example, molecular biology, premedical, predental, and pharmacy. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Chemistry (CHEM) 130, 130L and 231, 231L combined: maximum credit, one course (with Lab).
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 231 and Chemistry 231L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 233L with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the second semester of a one-year sequence in Organic Chemistry. The topics covered include, but are not limited to, molecular structure, molecular behavior, nomenclature, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis. An emphasis is placed on the reactions of selected classes of organic compounds, such as alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, benzenoid and heterocyclic aromatics and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids their bio-organic compounds. The study of these molecules provides a backdrop for exploring the factors that govern particular transformations within a synthetic sequence. The use of print and electronic media and the interpretation of spectroscopic information (such as infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopies, and mass spectrometry) for the analysis and differentiation of molecular structures is continued. This course is designed for students pursuing a baccalaureate degree in the chemical sciences or in majors such as premedical, predental or pharmacy; and for students training for careers in some chemical technology fields. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
6 hours lab, 2 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 231 and Chemistry 231L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 233 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the second semester of a one-year sequence in Organic Chemistry Laboratory and is designed to illustrate the principles presented in Chemistry 233. The emphasis is on synthesis, purification and/or characterization of selected classes of organic compounds, including but not limited to aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, amines, and simple examples of bio-organic molecules. Additional emphasis is placed on multi-step synthetic pathways and product identification using selected methods of qualitative organic analysis such as wet chemical and advanced spectroscopic techniques. Variation of scale from micro- to macro-quantities, and more advanced separation and analytical techniques, distinguish the level of this course from Organic Chemistry I Laboratory. This course is intended for students pursuing a baccalaureate degree in the chemical sciences or in majors such as premedical, predental or pharmacy; and for students training for careers in some chemical technology fields. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 201 and 201L, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 122 or 150, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This is a course in quantitative analysis. Major topics include theory and practice of gravimetric and volumetric methods of chemical analysis and introduction to instrumental methods of analysis with a focus on precision and accuracy of experimental data. This course is intended for students majoring in chemistry or biochemistry and others who need the course for career advancement. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chemistry 152 with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is designed for students who want to learn how the pharmaceutical industry works. Specifically it is intended for those interested in the drug discovery, development and approval processes. The course covers principles pertinent to working in the pharmaceutical industry. Topics include good lab practice (GLP), good manufacturing practice (GMP), hazardous materials management, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), drug approval, and drug design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: glish 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an introductory survey of the field of Chicana/o Studies and the factors that influence the Chicano culture. Emphasis is placed on the historical development of the Chicano people including their Mesoamerican roots, cultural identification, political activities, and their contemporary roles and influence in United States culture, society and economy. This course is designed for students majoring in Chicano Studies and/or Social Sciences and all students interested in Chicana/o culture. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of the field of Chicano Studies and the historical and contemporary factors that influence Chicano society. Emphasis is placed on the Chicana/o experience in the United States through an analysis of the social, political, and economic factors that impact and shape the Chicana/o community. This course is designed all students interested in Chicano Studies. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49 each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of Mexican literature in translation. Students are introduced to authors of the novel, short story, poem, essay, and folklore within the context of Mexican history, politics and society. This course is designed for Chicano Studies majors and anyone interested in literature. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49 each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of Chicano and Chicana culture which examines language, literature and oral expression in historical and thematic context. Emphasis is placed on understanding and interpreting the cultural, ethnic, social and political dynamics that inform and influence literary, theoretical, performance and visual texts as they articulate the Chicano/a perspective. This course is designed for Chicano Studies majors and anyone interested in literature. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 42 and English 43, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R4 and W4.

Description: A survey of the novels, short stories, poetry and major Latin American writers, from the end of the Colonial Period to the present. Emphasis will be given to major contemporary authors reflecting the universality of Mestizo (Raza) masterpieces. This course is for all students with an interest in the study of Latin American literature. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of early American history from the Mexican/Chicano perspective. Emphasis is placed on the period of discovery to the period of Reconstruction with emphasis on the evolution, influence, and experience of the Chicano. Students analyze Chicano contributions to the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States. This course is intended for all students interested in history, ethnic studies, or other social sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: History (HIST) 109-110, 141-142, 150-151, Black Studies (BLAS) 140A-140B, and/or Chicano Studies (CHIC) 141A-141B combined: maximum credit, one series.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This is a survey course in American history that covers the period of the American acquisition in 1848 of Mexico to the present. Emphasis is placed the role of Chicanos in the development of the United states throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include slavery in the former Mexican territories, the Native American experience, immigration patterns and constitutional development and government in California. This course is intended for all students interested in history, ethnic studies, or other social issues. (FT) AA/ AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: History (HIST) 109- 110, 141-142, 150-151, Black Studies (BLAS) 140A-140B, and/or Chicano Studies (CHIC) 141A-141B combined: maximum credit, one series.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of Mexican history from the ancient times to the present. Special emphasis is given to major historical developments from the time of the Spanish Conquest to the Revolution of 1910 and its aftermath. Special consideration is given to the economic, political, social, and cultural factors which have shaped modern Mexico. This course is designed for students majoring in Chicano Studies or History and prepares students for careers dealing with Mexico and/or Mexican culture and the relationships between Mexico and the United States. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is the study of the Chicana in American society in historical and sociological perspective. Emphasis is placed on Chicana feminist scholarship and cultural representations, border issues, resistance to patriarchy, and the search for power. This course is designed for all students interested in Chicana and Chicano studies. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a critical approach to cinematic images of Chicanos as depicted in selected films. Focus is placed on stereotypical and negative portrayals during early cinema with an examination of the more realistic and complex portraits of more recent times. Film genres, such as early Hollywood features, documentaries and the emerging “Chicano film” are examined. This course is designed for students interested in film studies with a special focus on the Chicano experience in film. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course examines the Indigenous traditions of Mexico and Ancient Mesoamerica. The course explores the culture and history of the Mesoamerican civilizations and their relationship with the societies of Aridamerica and Oasisamerica, and the experiences of the Indigenous communities from the colonial times to the present. This course is intended for students who are pursuing a major in Chicana and Chicano Studies, History, Ethnic Studies, or other Social Sciences, and all students interested in the Mexican culture. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a study of Chicana/o culture in the United States. Emphasis is placed on historical and contemporary representations of Chicana/os through their cultural products, such as music, dance, theatre, literature and film. Students apply Cultural Studies theories to analyze and interpret Chicana/o cultural products. This course is designed for all students interested in Chicana/o culture. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a comprehensive overview of the major influences, themes and styles in Chicano art from its emergence in the 1960s to the beginning of the 21st century. Emphasis is placed on the historical, social and cultural context of the Chicano/a art movement and the major forces that shape artistic creation within this field. Topics include Chicano paintings, murals, prints, sculpture, installation, performance and video. This course is designed for all students interested in Chicano studies and for art majors who want to explore a revolutionary contemporary art movement. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
Hours by Arrangement, 1-3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from instructor for registration.

Description: For students with advanced background in Chicano Studies who wish to study special problems or work on specialized projects. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
Class sections of the following courses utilize a variety of reading and/or research materials from a Chicano perspective. Refer to the class schedule under the particular subject listing for designated sections. See page 394 for complete English course descriptions and page 354 for complete Communications Studies course descriptions.
English
43 English Review
49 Basic Composition (no longer degree applicable)
101 Reading and Composition
105 Composition and Literature
205 Critical Thinking and Intermediate Composition
Communications Studies
103 Oral Communication
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course examines the interrelationship among the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial growth and development of individuals from conception through adolescence. It emphasizes positive relationships with family members, peers, and other significant individuals. Topics include theories and philosophies of human development and cross-cultural patterns. Students observe children and educational programs. This course is a core requirement for the State of California Child Development Permit and the State of California Community Care Licensing, Title XXII. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Child Development (CHIL) 101 and 103 combined: maximum credit, one course.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a study of music and perceptual motor activities in child development from infancy through kindergarten. Emphasis is placed on basic teaching techniques and suitable materials and equipment for toddlers and preschool children. This course is designed for students who have an interest in working with children ages 0 – 5 in early childhood environments. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course introduces the creative process and experience in early childhood education programs. Emphasis is placed on creative development, art curriculum activities, basic teaching skills, guidance techniques, equipment, and materials. Students select appropriate activities for a variety of age and maturity levels based on child development theories and concepts. This course is intended for students majoring in Child Development or others interested in the creative process in early childhood education. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Child Development 133 or 135.

Description: This course is an introductory study of the function of language, math and science learning in early childhood educational programs. Emphasis is placed on the development of language and science curriculum activities, basic teaching skills, guidance techniques, equipment and materials. Students select appropriate activities for a variety of age groups and maturity levels based on child development theories and concepts. This course is designed for Child Development majors and may be used to partially fulfill requirements for Title 22 licensing and child development permits. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a study of the dynamics of human development and socialization in a culturally pluralistic society. Emphasis is placed on the influences of contemporary family living and cultural patterns on the child, school-family relationships, and community resources and services that support and strengthen families. This course is a core requirement for California Child Development teacher/director center permits as well as for the State of California Department of Community Care Title 22 licensing childcare centers requirements. This course is designed for all students interested in child development and multi-cultural and behavioral studies. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Child Development 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent and Child Development 111, 121, 131, 133, 135 or 153, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Child Development 270.

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course focuses on planning the preschool learning environment to promote optimal development. Emphasis is placed on curriculum planning, guidance, safety, record keeping, observation techniques, project planning, and classroom management. Students enrolled in this course must be concurrently working in a preschool learning environment under the supervision of a person holding a Child Development Master Teacher Permit or the equivalent. This course is intended for students pursuing teaching careers in early care and education settings and partially fulfills State of California Permit and Title 22 teacher requirements. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Description: This course is a practical study of school age program planning. Emphasis is placed on the details of planning a school age program, curriculum development, staff training and guidance, and health and safety. This course is designed for students majoring in Child Development and/or those planning to work with school age children in community settings. This course may be used to partially fulfill State of California Development Permit Requirements and Title 21 teaching requirements. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1 hour lecture, 1 unit Grade Only

Description: This seminar course provides students with the opportunity to critically reflect on their student teaching fieldwork in order to effectively apply the principles and best practices of early care and education programs to their on-site work experience. This course is intended for students seeking teaching positions in early care and education settings and partially fulfills State of California Permit and Title 22 teacher requirements. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5

Limitation on Enrollment: Health and Safety. TB clearance within the last year is required.

Description: This course focuses on behavioral patterns and growth processes of young children through observations and supervised participation in the campus Child Development Center. The course emphasizes the principles of observing, interpreting, and guiding children’s behavior. Topics include children’s developmental, safety, and nutritional needs. This course is intended for students majoring in child development and parents of children enrolled in the campus child development center. This course partially fulfills the specialization requirements for the State of California Master Teacher Permit. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: Health and Safety. TB clearance within the last year is required.

Description: This course explores current issues in child development and how these issues influence both the child and family. The course emphasizes effective communication skills, positive guidance techniques, kindergarten readiness skills, and appropriate classroom activities. This course is intended for students majoring in child development and parents of children enrolled in the campus child development center. This course partially fulfills the specialization requirements for the State of California Master Teacher Permit. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a survey of education for children with special needs. Emphasis iThis course is a survey of education for children with special needs. Emphasis is placed on the types and characteristics of special needs as well as on the methods for integrating children with special needs into inclusive educational settings. Topics include the history of special education legislation, current educational compliance requirements and community resources available to parents, teachers and other professionals. This course is designed for professionals and parents who work with children with special needs. This course partially fulfills the specialization requirement for the State of California Master Teacher Permit. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an in-depth study of curriculum for children with special needs. Emphasis is placed on the concept of full inclusion of children with special needs into school/community settings and on related educational strategies and adaptive equipment. This course is designed for parents, teachers, nurses, social workers, and paraprofessionals employed in schools, day care centers, and child development programs. This course partially meets the specialization requirements for the Master Teacher Permit. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course examines typical and atypical physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth of the infant and toddler. The selection and maintenance of appropriate play materials and equipment for indoor and outdoor environments is discussed. Appropriate observations and visitations to the community are required. This course meets State of California Title 22 licensing regulations for teachers in infant toddler settings and fulfills the Infant/Toddler specialization requirement for the State of California Master Teacher Permit when taken in addition to Child Development 176. It is intended for students majoring in child development, parents, or those interested in infant/toddler care. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is a study of the principles of infant/ toddler care, including all aspects of infant and toddler development. Students learn to plan appropriate indoor and outdoor curriculum and environments. Other topics include health, nutrition and safety for the very young as well as licensing regulations, staff interactions, parent participation, and program development. This course meets State of California Title 22 licensing regulations for teachers in infant toddler settings and fulfills the Infant/Toddler specialization requirement for the State of California Master Teacher Permit when taken in addition to Child Development 175. It is intended for students majoring in child development, parents, or those interested in infant/toddler care. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 42 and English 43, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R4 and W4.

Description: This course is a survey of the nutritional, health, and safety needs of children from infant/toddlers through preschool age. Topics include but are not limited to the planning and execution of environments and activities that promote safety, balanced diet, and overall health for children. Students also learn the fundamentals of pediatric first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This course meets the Title XXII, fifteen hour, Health and Safety Training requirement, including signs and symptoms of child abuse. This course is intended for students majoring in child development and practicing child development professionals. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49 each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course examines the causes and effects of violence in the lives of children and families. Emphasis is placed on the skills needed for conflict resolution and on the environmental set-ups and curricula that promote peaceful, cooperative and nonviolent play and interactions. Information about the history, current legislation, reporting responsibilities, and identification of abuse is also given. This course is designed for parents, teachers, nurses, and other child care professionals to learn strategies for understanding and responding to the various forms of stress and violence that affect children today. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Child Development 101 and 141, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: English 48, English 49 and Mathematics 38, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5, W5 and M30; Child Development 111 and 121 or 131, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an overview of early childhood education program administration. Topics include theoretical perspectives on early childhood education, licensing regulations, funding sources, budgetary considerations, personnel management, curriculum development, and teacher selection. The course meets State of California Title 22 licensing regulations for site supervisors. It also partially fulfills State of California matrix requirements for Program Director and Site Supervisor Permits. This course is intended for anyone seeking a position as a site supervisor or center director. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Child Development 141 and 151, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Child Development 201 or 201B.

Description: This course is a study of the supervisory tools and techniques required to organize and evaluate early childhood programs. Emphasis is placed on supervisory functions, in-service staff training, educational philosophies, program and staff evaluation, models of parent education and involvement, and supportive services. This course is designed for students who intend to go into supervisory positions in early childhood education, and it partially fulfills the State of California Child Development Permit Matrix requirement for supervisors and directors and also meets the State of California Title 22 licensing regulations for directors. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Child Development 151 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a study of the methods and principles of supervising adults in early childhood settings. Students study effective models for guiding and evaluating adults, developing positive communication skills and recognizing the role of mentors in teaching environments. This course is designed for students who supervise other adults in classrooms while simultaneously providing appropriate settings for young children. This course partially meets the requirements for the Master Teacher Permit, Site Supervisor and Program Director permits issued by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. AA/AS.
60–300 hours other, 1–4 units Grade Only

This course is for Child Development students to acquire on-the-job training within an early care and education facility and partially fulfills State of California Permit and Title 22 teacher requirements. The combined maximum credit for all work experience course work from all disciplines may not exceed 16 units. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3–9 hours lab, 1–3 units Grade Only

Corequisite: Child Development 151.

Advisory: Child Development 160 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This directed field study course provides students with an opportunity to apply classroom information in a practical setting with supervision from faculty as well as field-site supervisors. Intended for students who plan to teach or supervise in early childhood settings, this course partially fulfills the State of California requirement for experience. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 42 and English 43, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R4 and W4.

Description: This course provides students with an introduction to the Early Childhood Environmental Rating Scale (ECERS) administration, scoring system, profile, and improvement plan. The course focuses on environmental evaluation and program improvement. Students learn how to evaluate the quality of child care programs and how to increase the quality of care through practical improvements. This course is intended for child development professionals currently working in the field as well as those seeking professional development, child development permits, employment opportunities, or anyone with general interest in working with children. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
Hours by Arrangement, 1-3 units Grade Only

Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from instructor for registration.

Description: Investigation of a special area in the field of Child Development. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course provides directed laboratory experience in the campus Child Development Center. Students become familiar with the operating policies and procedures of a preschool program and observe and access the development of children. This course may be used toward the experience component for the State of California Child Development Permit. It is intended for students who plan careers in early childhood and family support programs and for parents who seek practical experience in guiding and teaching children. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course provides directed laboratory experience in the campus Child Development Center. Students examine appropriate safety, health, and nutritional practices in a preschool setting with an emphasis on implementation with young children. This course may be used toward the experience component for the State of California Child Development Permit and toward the Health and Safety training requirements for Title 22. It is intended for students who plan careers in early childhood education and family support programs and for parents who seek practical experience in guiding and teaching children. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course provides directed laboratory experience in the campus Child Development Center. Students explore teaching practices that enhance children’s learning in the classroom and assist in the planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate activities. This course may be used toward the experience component for the State of California Child Development Permit. It is intended for students who plan careers in early childhood and family support programs and for parents who seek practical experience in guiding and teaching children. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course provides directed laboratory experience in the campus Child Development Center. Students examine the role of routines and transitional activities in the organization and structure of an early child development setting. The class emphasizes positive guidance and discipline for young children. This course may be used toward the field experience component for the State of California Child Development Permit. It is intended for students who plan careers in early childhood and family support programs and for parents who seek practical experience in guiding and teaching children. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
5 hours lecture, 5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 43 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level W4.

Description: This interactive, entry-level course introduces students to the Mandarin Chinese language and to Chinese culture. Emphasis is placed on the basic phonetic system, characters, grammar and common daily expressions. Topics also include Chinese culture, geography and history. This course is intended for students interested in an introduction to Mandarin Chinese language. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Corresponds to two years of high school study.
5 hours lecture, 5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chinese 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or two years of high school Chinese.

Description: This interactive, elementary course in Mandarin Chinese builds upon the listening, reading, speaking and writing skills introduced in the entry-level course. Emphasis is placed on phonetics, characters, grammar, tone usage and common daily expressions. This course is intended for students who have completed the first course in the Chinese language sequence and want to continue their second-semester Chinese course, students who want to further their basic proficiency in the Chinese language, and students who want to continue learning Chinese for their personal enrichment. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
5 hours lecture, 5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chinese 102 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or three years of high school Chinese.

Description: This intermediate-level study of Mandarin Chinese is the third course in the Chinese language sequence. Students use increasingly complex Mandarin language structures and vocabulary to listen, speak, read and write at the intermediate level. This course is intended for students who have completed the second course in the Chinese language sequence and who are planning on majoring in Chinese or are interested in learning Chinese for their personal enrichment. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
5 hours lecture, 5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chinese 201 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This intermediate-advanced level study of Mandarin Chinese is the fourth course in the Chinese language sequence. Students use increasingly complex Mandarin language structures and vocabulary to listen, speak, read and write at the intermediateadvanced level. This course is intended for students who have completed the third course in the Chinese language sequence and who are planning on majoring in Chinese or are interested in learning Chinese for their personal enrichment. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chinese 102 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is an interactive course in Chinese conversation and composition at the intermediate level. In this course, students are encouraged to express themselves creatively both orally and in writing as they explore a variety of topics in Chinese. This course is intended for students who have completed the first two courses in the Chinese language sequence. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Chinese 210 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is an interactive course in Mandarin Chinese conversation and composition at the intermediate-advanced level. In this course, students are encouraged to express themselves creatively both orally and in writing as they explore a variety of topics in Chinese at an intermediate-advanced level. This course is intended for students who have completed the first course in the Chinese language conversation and composition sequence. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 101.

Description: This course is designed to improve vocal production and the articulation, enunciation, and pronunciation of words. Emphasis is placed on sound production, voice quality, volume, pitch and expressiveness. This course is intended for communications studies majors and anyone involved in theatre, sales, public services or other professions. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 103.

Description: This course is an introduction to speechmaking. Emphasis is placed on the skills required to organize and deliver a variety of types of speeches. Students give several speeches with and without visual aids. This course is designed for Communication Studies majors and for anyone interested in honing their speech skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID COMM 110.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Communication Studies 103 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 104.

Description: This course covers theory, practice and critical analysis of public communication, including speeches on subjects of current interest both local and global. It includes an introduction to the relationship between rhetorical theory and criticism and rhetorical practice in public communication. Special emphasis is placed on advanced platform speaking and limited preparation speaking. This course is designed for students majoring in communication studies and students interested in advancing fundamental speech skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 111.

Description: This course is a practical study of the art of oral interpretation. Emphasis is placed on developing a foundation for critical analyses of literature in order to enhance spoken interpretation of prose, poetry, dramatic monologue and duo. This course is designed for communication studies and drama majors as well as anyone interested in improving their oratory skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3-9 hours lab, 1-3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communication 117A.

Description: This course is for students participating in their first semester of intercollegiate forensics (speech and debate) competition. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of platform speeches (informative, persuasive and after-dinner) at the novice intercollegiate level. Students taking the course for one unit participate in one event at one tournament; for two units, two events at two tournaments; for three units, three events at three tournaments. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3-9 hours lab, 1-3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Communication Studies 117A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 117B.

Description: This course is for students participating in their second semester of intercollegiate forensics (speech and debate) competition. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of oral interpretation events (poetry, prose, dramatic interpretation, dramatic-duo, informative, persuasive, after-dinner, program of oral interpretation, impromptu and extemporaneous speeches) at the novice to junior intercollegiate level. Students taking the course for one unit participate in one event at one tournament; for two units, two events at two tournaments; for three units, three events at three tournaments. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3-9 hours lab, 1-3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Communication Studies 117B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 117C.

Description: This course is for students participating in their third semester of intercollegiate forensics (speech and debate) competition. Emphasis is placed on limited preparation speech events (impromptu and extemporaneous) and debate at the intermediate to advanced level. Students taking the course for one unit participate in one event at one tournament; for two units, two events at two tournaments; for three units, three events at three tournaments. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3-9 hours lab, 1-3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Communication Studies 117C with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 117D.

Description: This course is for students participating in their fourth semester of intercollegiate forensics (speech and debate) competition. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of five (pentathlon) speech events, debate and team leadership at the advanced level. Students taking the course for one unit participate in one event at one tournament; for two units, two events at two tournaments; for three units, three events at three tournaments. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 135.

Description: This course is a study of effective interpersonal skill development and practice in oral and written communication. Emphasis is placed on the personal, situational, and cultural influences of interaction. Topics include human perception, interpersonal dynamics, listening, conflict management, and verbal and non verbal symbol systems. The course is intended for students who communicate in one-on-one situations, including communication, fashion, allied health, public service and business majors. This course is also intended for students who are interested in further development of effective interpersonal skills in work, volunteer, and personal environments. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID COMM 130.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Communication Studies 103 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 160.

Description: This course is a study of argumentation. Emphasis is placed on research, analysis of propositions, testing of evidence, construction of the brief, and preparation for presentation of constructive and refutation cases. This course is designed for communications studies majors and anyone interested in argumentation and debate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID COMM 120.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5 and Communication Studies 103 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 170.

Description: This course is a study of the concepts and theories related to group formation and development, and basic group communication dynamics. Students lead 356 San Diego Mesa College • 2015–2016 Computer Business Technology (CBTE) and participate in various forms of group discussion. This course is designed for communication studies and business majors as well as for anyone interested in working effectively in small group settings. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID COMM 140.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Speech Communications 180.

Description: This course is a study of communication between members of differing cultures, including the influence of cultures, languages, and social patterns on how members of groups relate among themselves and with members of different ethnic and cultural groups. Topics include social psychological variables; verbal and nonverbal language systems; cross-cultural communication breakdowns; and conflict resolution. Students apply the principles of intercultural communication to contemporary cross-cultural and global communication issues. This course is designed for students majoring in communication studies or other fields that require cross-cultural contact and/or awareness of cultural distinctions. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
Hours by Arrangement, 1–3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from instructor for registration. Advanced special work in debate, radio interpretation, public address. AA/AS; CSU.

Description: This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.

Note: CBTE course numbers differ from the OFCE course numbers.

3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: Computer Business Technology 94 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is for students and professionals who want to improve keyboarding skills with emphasis on increasing speed and accuracy through timed exercises. (FT) AA/AS.
0.75 hours lecture, 0.75 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Office Information Systems 102, 164, 100, 101 or Computer Business Technology 102 or 103.

Description: This course is an overview of keyboarding techniques using the alphabetic and numeric keys on the computer. Students use computer software to develop keyboard skills to achieve a speed of 25 words per minute. This course is intended for all students interested in improved keyboard skills for personal and/or business use. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Office Information Systems 101, 102, 164, Computer Business Technology 101 or 103.

Description: This course covers touch control of the keyboard and proper typing techniques. Emphasis is placed on building speed and accuracy through specialized drills and practice on straight copy and numbers. Students apply keyboarding skills to the formatting of letters, reports, tables, and memos using word processing software. This course is intended for all students interested in improved keyboard skills for personal and/or business use. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Office Information Systems 100, 101, 102, 164, Computer Business Technology 101 or 102.

Description: This course covers basic keyboarding skills by touch using a computer and word processing software. Emphasis is placed on basic formatting for letters, tables, and reports. This course is designed for students and professionals acquiring or updating skills in keyboarding and word processing. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
0.75 hours lecture, 0.75 hours lab, CISC1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94, 101 or 103, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an overview of the features of the Microsoft Windows operating system and environment. Students learn to use and customize the start menu; work with Windows accessory programs; manage storage drives; work with folders and files; create shortcuts; and customize the desktop. This course is designed for students intending to use Microsoft Windows for academic, professional and/or personal purposes. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours CISClab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94, 101 or 103, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Computer Business Technology 120A or 120B.

Description: This course is an introduction to document formatting using Microsoft Word. Students create fliers, letters, memos, reports and office documents. Topics include mail merge and table basics. This course is designed for students intending to use Microsoft Word for academic, professional and/or personal purposes. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 CISCunits Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94, 101 or 103 and 120, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This intermediate-level course introduces advanced features and text editing tools of Microsoft Word. Students create reference documents, online forms and newsletters. Topics include the use of macros and collaboration and integration tools. This course is designed for students intending to use Microsoft Word for academic, professional and/or personal purposes. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; and Computer Business Technology 103 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is designed to give students handson experience creating a variety of computerbased documents. This course covers the use of computer software to create business, technical, medical and/or legal documents and to create forms, presentation documents, and documents for electronic publishing. It may include independent projects. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94 or 101 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course provides students with the basic knowledge of how to create, modify, and present PowerPoint slide shows. Students add and modify both text and graphics; insert and modify information graphics and multimedia; apply, modify, and create master pages; apply, modify, and create templates. Students integrate other Microsoft programs with PowerPoint. This course is designed for students and professionals acquiring or updating basic skills in creating and editing professional presentations. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 unitsCISC Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Computer Business Technology 101, 102 or 103 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent; English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Computer Business Technology 126.

Description: This course is a comprehensive hands-on study of the skills required to plan, develop, and deliver PowerPoint presentations on a computer and the Internet. Emphasis is placed on adding and modifying text, graphics, sound, video, and effects such as transitions and custom slide animations. Other topics include adding, modifying and creating templates; adding, importing, and formatting data for tables and charts; customizing presentations; adding interactivity features; and incorporating PowerPoint with other applications. This course is intended for all students and professionals who wish to acquire skills in digital presentations. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94, 101, 102 or 103 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Computer Business Technology140A or 143.

Description: This course is intended for students, office support personnel, and business owners who require a competency in performing tasks in Microsoft Excel. Students receive hand-on instruction on how to create, modify, and enhance workbooks and charts in addition to more advanced features in Excel such as PivotTables; PivotCharts; macros; and statistical, financial, and IF formulas. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
0.75 hours lecture, 0.75 hours lab, CISC1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 101, 102 or 103 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Computer Business Technology 140 or 143.

Description: This course is intended for students, office support staff, and small business owners who require a basic knowledge of Microsoft Excel. Students receive hands-on practice on how to plan, create, modify, and enhance worksheets and charts. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 103 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Computer Business Technology 94, 101 or 102, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Computer Business Technology 140A.

Description: This course is designed for students preparing for a career or job in which a competency in intermediateto- advanced Excel functions is required to perform daily tasks. Students receive hands-on instruction on charts, PivotTables, PivotCharts, functions, formulas, data validation, autofilters, what-if analyses, templates, macros, Visual Basic for applications, and integration of Excel with other programs. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
0.75 hours lecture, 0.75 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49 or English 47A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 101 and Computer Business Technology 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course covers basic Access skills. Students receive hands-on practice in creating, modifying, and sorting database tables, performing queries, creating reports, and designing forms. This course is designed for students and professionals acquiring or updating basic skills in creating and editing access databases. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours CISClab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94, 101, 102 or 103 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Microsoft Access. Topics include creating, modifying, and sorting database tables; creating queries; creating and enhancing custom forms and reports; modifying the database structure; and importing and exporting data to other programs. This course is intended for students majoring in a computer business technology field, professionals acquiring or updating basic skills in creating and editing professional databases, or anyone interested in learning the fundamental functions of Access. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, CISC3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94, 101, 102 or 103 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an intermediate level study of Microsoft Access and its use as a relational database management system on a personal computer. Topics include designing relational databases; creating tables, queries, forms and reports; entering data; finding and modifying records; importing from and exporting to other programs; using field properties; understanding the use of Structured Query Language (SQL) in Access; creating and running macros for automating tasks; and planning and designing user interfaces. This course is designed for students and professionals acquiring or updating skills in creating and editing Access databases. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course provides students with fundamental knowledge and skills required to work with Microsoft Project. Students create and refine project schedules, resources, calendars, and reports. This course is designed for students majoring in Business, Computer Business Technology, and/or Information, Network, and Web Technologies, as well as for business professionals seeking to update project management skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
0.75 hours lecture, 0.75 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 103 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a basic, hands-on study of the internet. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental skills and techniques required to use the Web efficiently in personal, professional and business settings. This course is intended for students majoring in a variety of applied computer fields. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 114 and 161, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course provides a hands-on approach to creating web pages for an intranet or website. Students learn to use Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), wizards, and templates to create web pages with links and graphics and multimedia enhancements. Students will use basic Cascading Style Sheet (CSS). This course is intended for students majoring in Computer Business Technology and professionals seeking a basic knowledge of HTML. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
0.75 hours lecture, 0.75 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94 or 101 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to the features of Microsoft Outlook. Students learn how to manage messages, schedule appointments, organize and manage tasks and contact lists, and customize Outlook. This course is designed for students intending to use Microsoft Outlook for academic, professional and/or personal purposes. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, CISC3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 101, Computer Business Technology 114 and Computer Business Technology 161, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a hands-on study of webpage creation. Students use a HyperText Markup Language (HTML) editor to create HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Web development skills include adding behaviors, using templates and library items, and embedding hypertext links, video, graphic, and multimedia files. This course is designed for students and professionals acquiring or updating skills in creating and editing simple webpages. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: Computer Business Technology 101, 102 or 103 and 114 and 161, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent; English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course teaches students how to create websites using Microsoft Expression Web. Students use a hands-on approach to design, analyze, create, manage, and publish websites on the Internet for personal or business use. Topics include formatting text using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (XHTML), and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Other topics include images, hyperlinks, templates, tables, forms, and page layout and design. This course is intended for students majoring in Computer Business Technology or others interested in web design. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5. Computer Business Technology 101 and 114, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is designed for students interested in preparing or upgrading skills for a career or job in which desktop publishing competencies are required. Topics include text and table frames, WordArt, images, graphic accents, and Web page functions. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 114, Computer Business Technology 161 and Computer Business Technology 162, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is an introduction to current and emerging e-commerce technologies. Topics include Internet technology for business advantage; managing e-commerce funds transfer; reinventing the future of business through e-commerce; business opportunities in e-commerce; social, political, and ethical issues associated with e-commerce; and business plans for technology ventures. Students are involved in creating an e-commerce marketing plan. This course is intended for students seeking knowledge and experience in the realities of and potential for e-commerce. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 3 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Computer Business Technology 101 and Multimedia 127, each with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent; English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an introduction to publishing for output to digital or print media. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of graphic design and printing conventions currently used in digital publishing and print. Students edit texts and graphics to design page layouts to create proposals, newsletters, flyers, brochures, and posters. Students are introduced to e-publishing and self-publishing principles and formats. This course is designed for anyone interested in advanced digital publishing, include those interested in self-publishing. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: Computer Business Technology 101 and Computer Business Technology 175, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent; English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in: Multimedia 121 and Multimedia 122, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course provides students with advanced skills that are necessary to create documents that are pre-press ready and published to the web. Students create sophisticated documents by combining text, images, charts, and tables and by applying typography and design principles to their layouts. Advanced topics include managing long documents, advanced typesetting functions, managing output to print, creating HyperText Markup Language (HTML) documents, and interactive presentations. Students prepare and format documents in e-publishing formats, and upload documents to an online store or website. This course is designed for anyone interested in advanced digital publishing, include those interested in self-publishing. (FT) AA/ AS; CSU.
1 hour lecture, 1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: Computer Business Technology 114 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This hands-on course offers instruction in the creation of Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF) documents, the standard file format for portable print and Internet documents. Students develop skills in creating PDF documents, embedding multimedia, adding interactive navigation, and creating forms. This course is designed for students studying Web design and anyone interested in PDF document creation. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94, 101 or 114 and 161, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is designed for students interested in an overview and basic working knowledge of Microsoft Office Professional suite for personal and/or professional purposes. Emphasis is placed on word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentations, and the integration of data within and between the programs. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 103 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course provides hands-on practice with Quicken. Emphasis is placed on organizing and managing financial information and performing online banking and bill payments for small businesses and home-based offices using the Quicken program. This course is designed for students and professionals acquiring or updating skills related to managing financial information. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lab, 0.5 units Pass/No Pass Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: Students in this course design and complete hands on individualized projects applicable to CBTE courses to upgrade their software skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 2 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5.

Description: This course provides students with a fundamental working knowledge of voice, data, and video telecommunications that can be applied in their business and personal lives. The course introduces telecommunications networks, transmitting, receiving, and satellite technologies. Topics include basic communication theory, fundamentals of telephone systems, and components of data communications systems. This course is intended for students interested in the selection or use of office telecommunications systems. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 94 or 101, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course covers the fundamentals of traditional and electronic records management. Topics include indexing and the major filing methods; selection of systems, equipment, and supplies; design, control, and maintenance of inactive records; and the role of records management and the records manager in the information industry. This course is designed to prepare students for employment in the field of Records Information Management (RIM) and for students interested in records management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 151 and 205 or Computer Business Technology 152 or 180, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to electronic records management. Emphasis is placed on the use of electronic media to create and store documents. This course is designed for students pursuing a career in records management and for those interested in managing electronic files. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Computer Business Technology 205 and Computer Business Technology 206, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a hands-on study of the applications required to create a records management program. Records Information Management (RIM) projects include creating an industry specific file plan, vital records protection plan, disaster recovery program, and the automation of records systems. This course is intended for students who are looking for employment or an associate degree in RIM. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course in an introduction to the role and use of computers, computer technology, and electronic communication in business environments. Emphasis is placed on privacy, security, information management, and ethical issues. This course is designed for students and professionals interested in the use and role of technology in business environments. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6; Computer Business Technology 94, 101, 102 or 103 and 120, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is designed to introduce and reinforce the practical use of current office administration procedures, duties, and human relations for office application. Topics also include office etiquette and dress, time management, communications systems San Diego Mesa College • 2015–2016 363 Computer and Information Sciences (CISC) AA/AS = Associate Degree Applicable CSU = California State University Applicable UC = University of California Applicable and oral and computer presentations. This course is designed for Computer Business Technology majors as a capstone to be taken at the end of their coursework. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
Hours by Arrangement (One unit of credit is earned for each 75 hours of paid employment or 60 hours of volunteer work.), 1–4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48 and 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5; Business 101 and Computer Business Technology 103, 161.

Description: The Computer Business Technology Work Experience program is designed to extend occupational learning through employment and coordinate the on-the-job training and the classroom instruction. The goals and learning objectives will be designed by the student cooperatively with the employer and work experience instructor/coordinator. The combined maximum credit for all work experience courses from all disciplines may not exceed 16 units. (FT) AA/AS.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

This course is a survey of computers, computer systems and information sciences. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers in business and technical fields. Topics include computer equipment and programming systems, systems study, design, development and implementation. This course is intended for all students interested in computers and how to use them. (FT) AA/AS; CSU. 152 Introduction to the Linux Operating System 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Pass/No Pass Only

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with credit for Computer and Information Sciences 151.

Description: This introductory course to the Linux Operating systems is for new users to learn the programs and services that made the Linux System so increasingly popular, including: the shell, communicating to other users, manipulating files using the file structure, setting file access permissions, full-screen text editing, and programming simple shell scripts. The Novell SuSE Linux implementation is used in the course, but other versions of Linux are also appropriate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Pass/No Pass Only

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with credit for Computer and Information Sciences 151.

Description: This introductory course to the Linux Operating systems is for new users to learn the programs and services that made the Linux System so increasingly popular, including: the shell, communicating to other users, manipulating files using the file structure, setting file access permissions, full-screen text editing, and programming simple shell scripts. The Novell SuSE Linux implementation is used in the course, but other versions of Linux are also appropriate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an introduction to basic principles and theory relating to problem solving and analysis in business organizations using computers and software packages. Emphasis is placed on computer organization, data processing systems, decision support systems, and systems analysis. Business software is reviewed with an emphasis on spreadsheet systems including hands-on spreadsheet applications. This course is intended for the transfer student planning to major in business, economics, or social science. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

This course provides transfer students with an introduction to computer technology. It targets students who need to complete a computer literacy course as part of their degree or certificate program. Computer software, networking, and systems are covered, with an emphasis on modern technologies. This course also serves community members interested in an introduction to computer technology. Students who have completed CISC 181 should consult with a counselor before enrolling in CISC 182. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Computer and Information Sciences 181 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an introduction to programming using Visual Basic. It covers the fundamentals of event oriented programming in a Windows environment. Topics include the use and programming of a mouse, windows, forms, menus, dialog boxes, icons, buttons, text fields, files, graphics, and other components of a Windows environment in Visual Basic. This course is intended for students majoring in computer science or anyone interested in computer programming. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Computer and Information Sciences 190 or 192, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course introduces students to data structures and object-oriented software engineering. Emphasis is placed on basic data structures, including collections and linked structures (stacks, queues, lists, arrays, trees, and hashes) from the perspective of object-oriented implementation. Topics also include object-oriented analysis, design, and implementation in popular programming languages, such as C++, C#CISC, and Java. This course is designed for students majoring in computer information systems and professionals in the field who want to updateCISC their skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5. Mathematics 34A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M20. Computer and Information Sciences 186 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: Computer and Information Sciences 186 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent. This course is an introduction to programming using Java. The course covers the fundamentals of object-oriented programming utilizing the Java programming language for general purpose business programs and interactive World Wide Web-based Internet programs. This course is intended for students majoring in computer and information sciences or anyone interested in the Java programming language. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R5 and W5; Computer and Information Sciences 186 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course presents basic programming concepts using the C++ programming language. The organization of standard Input/Output (I/O) classes is emphasized. Structured- and object-oriented programming techniques are presented and used to design and implement a variety of programming problems. This course is intended for students majoring in computer science or anyone interested in computer programming. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

This course applies industry-standard software engineering principles to the study of the object-oriented, general purpose programming language Microsoft C#, a member of the Microsoft Visual Studio.NET software development toolset. Coverage includes the typical topics of an introductory programming course. Extensive hands-on training is included in the laboratory sessions. This course is designed for students pursuing a degree in Computer Science or Information Systems and for vocational/professional students who are updating their programming skills set. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Computer and Information Sciences 192 and 205, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Computer and Information Sciences 196

Description: This course is an advanced hands-on study of the C++ language programming best practices currently used in the industry. Emphasis is placed on generic programming through the use of templates and object-oriented programming. Robust and reliable coding practices are promoted through the disciplined use of exception handling and unit testing. This course is designed for computer science students and anyone interested in advancing their C++ programming skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: Computer and Information Sciences 106 and 192, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to the development of mobile games for iOS platforms. Emphasis is placed on the use of the Xcode and Interface Builder developer tools, the Objective-C or Swift programming language, and the Cocoa software framework to develop a game application that runs on an iOS platform, such as an iPhone and/or iPad. Topics include the major design patterns of the Cocoa framework. This course is designed for students majoring in computer and information science, software engineering or game programming and anyone interested in updating their programming skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
2 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: Computer and Information Sciences 106 and 190, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is an introduction to the development of mobile games for the Android platform. Emphasis is placed on the use of the Java programming language and support tools to develop a game application that runs on the Android platform. Topics include the major design patterns of the Android framework. This course is designed for students majoring in computer and information science, software engineering or game programming and anyone interested in updating their programming skills. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.

Description: This course is an introductory, experiential study of the phases of the object-oriented software development life cycle (OOSDLC), including: stakeholder and requirements analysis; use cases development; software architecture; project management; user interface considerations; interactive and prototyping methodology; component construction; quality assurance; and configuration management. This course is intended for students seeking advanced knowledge and applications in Computer and Information Sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Advisory: Computer and Information Sciences 187, 190, 192 or 193 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course introduces software programmers to the design and development of simple graphical computer-based games. The course may use Java or C# as the programming language of choice. Emphasis is placed on developing games in a team environment, designing logical games that satisfy player needs, and on ensuring that games are of high quality through use of software engineering best practices and proper testing. This course is for students with some previous software programming experience. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Prerequisite: Computer and Information Sciences 220 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course covers the field of software game program development. Students work as a team to design and build a complex software game. Students learn the essential elements of game construction, the constituent technologies that facilitate their development, and collaborative software development and integration methodologies. This course is designed for students interested in entering the software game development field, or for working computer professionals who want to extend their knowledge and skills to include game programming technologies. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
Hours by Arrangement, 1-3 units Grade Only

Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from instructor for registration.

Description: Typically for advanced students in Computer and Information Sciences who wish to pursue special problems and projects related to the area. The student will meet with the instructor at specific intervals and will be expected to accomplish primary research, problem analysis and report preparation relating to an approved project or course of study. AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.

(See Architecture, page 306)

3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 48, English 49 and Mathematics 34A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5, W5 and M20. Computer and Information Sciences 186 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is a study of the theories and techniques for managing personal income. Emphasis is placed on financial goal setting, culminating in the development of a personal financial plan. Topics include practical methods for gaining maximum advantages from income through efficient spending, effective use of credit, savings, budgeting, insurance, and investment. Stock portfolios and retirement planning are also discussed. This course is designed for all students interested in personal finance. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.

Formerly Food Service Occupations (FOOD)
Note: CACM course numbers differ from the former FOOD course numbers.

3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: English 42 and English 43, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R4 and W4.

Advisory: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Hospitality 101, Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 105 and 110, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 107.

Description: This course provides safety and sanitation principles and practices for personal and institutional application. Methods and techniques for handling foods safely are examined including food preparation, storage, service and the prevention of food contamination. Also covered are the importance of microorganisms, food borne illness and food allergies, sanitary facilities and equipment, accident prevention, crisis management, and pest management. Compliance with city, state, and federal health regulation as embodied in HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) are emphasized, along with the supervisor’s responsibilities in maintaining high standards of these principles. This course is required for all Culinary Arts/Culinary Management students and is to be taken as the first course prior to all other culinary courses or concurrently with the starting sequence of culinary courses. It may be used for national American Culinary Federation (ACF) recertification. Students taking this class and passing with a “C” or better will be able to sit for the ServSafe national food safety and sanitation manager certification. ServSafe certification currently qualifies holder as qualified foodhandler in the county of San Diego. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 105.

Description: This course provides basic terminology and methods of food production and an understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of food. The variety of basic and specially prepared foods served in hotels, restaurants and other types of food service establishments are introduced, and hierarchy of culinary positions and personal management is also presented. Food grades and standards of quality for finished products are presented. This is a beginning course for students with an interest in culinary arts/culinary management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
12 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 110.

Description: This is a beginning laboratory course in food preparation and presentation including cooking equipment, techniques, and safety procedures, using weights and measures, and interpretation of recipes. Product identification, basic cooking techniques and procedures based on nutrition and classic preparation methods are presented. Students are provided the hands-on experience in preparing meals by following recipe structure and using and modifying recipes based on knowledge gained through the course. Food preparation is produced in a time-restricted setting to prepare for functioning in a commercial kitchen. This course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in Culinary Arts/Culinary Management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Advisory: Mathematics 38 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level M30.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 120.

Description: This course covers the key aspects of menu planning essential to building a menu or complete concept and operation of a foodservice facility. The principles of planning a menu are presented, from concept development and design mechanics to menu pricing and marketing issues. Each menu element is analyzed as it applies to foodservice operations, balanced presentation, and profitability. Various types foodservices are presented for hotels, restaurants, foodservice facilities, and catering situations. This course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in Culinary Arts/ Culinary Management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 101, 105, and 110, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in: Culinary Arts/ Culinary Management 131 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 130.

Description: This intermediate course sets forth the principles of preparing and serving food in volume with focus on entrees, breakfast foods, salads, sandwiches, short orders, and desserts. Emphasis is placed on recipe standardization, determination of need and procurement of supplies, organization of 368 San Diego Mesa College • 2015–2016 Culinary Arts/Culinary Management (CAC M) work stations, effective use of equipment and time, and attractive service. This course is for students pursuing a career in Culinary Arts/Culinary Management, and is also required for the Dietary Service Supervisor Certificate offered through the Nutrition Department. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
12 hours lab, 4 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 101, 105, 110, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 130 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 131.

Description: This laboratory course supplements the Culinary Arts/Culinary Management theory course. Large scale food preparation is produced in a timerestricted, quality-minded setting. Emphasis is placed on the development, organization and carrying out of recipe standardization, need and procurement of supplies, work stations, and attractive service. This intermediate course is for students interested in a career in Culinary Arts/ Culinary Management and is required for the Dietary Service Supervisor Certificate offered through the Nutrition Department. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lecture, 3 units Grade Only

Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 140.

Description: This course covers techniques for purchasing food, beverages, and supplies used in hotels and restaurants. Students learn to analyze the operation, promotion, sales cost, and inventory controls on food and beverages. Students gain realistic experience by writing foodservice specifications, based on general purchasing methods, requirements, procedures, as well as the importance of controlling portions, inventories and costs and their affect on menu pricing. This course is designed for students interested in a career in hospitality and culinary arts/culinary management, and those working toward certification with the American Culinary Federation. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
9 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 101, 130, and 131, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 201.

Description: This laboratory course is designed to teach advanced food preparation techniques and methods. Students learn the science of scratch cookery through small batch assignments. Areas of focus include gourmet items, buffet specialties, hors d’oeuvres, and canapes, while practicing presentation and garnishing. Small scale preparation is produced in a time-restricted quality-minded setting. This course is for students pursuing a career in culinary arts/ culinary management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
9 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 101, 130, and 131, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 205.

Description: This laboratory course builds on skills previously learned while the student studies traditional upscale pantry preparation. Topics covered include hors d’oeuvres, canapes, pates, terrines and charcuterie. Artistic displays including buffet tables, centerpieces, culinary showpieces are presented. The student gains practical experience preparing and serving theme buffets for guests. Small and large-scale preparation is produced in a time-restricted qualityminded setting. This course is for students pursuing a career in culinary arts/culinary management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
9 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 101, 130, and 131, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 210.

Description: This course covers fundamental baking skills for students who intend to specialize in baking and pastry making instead of general cooking. Production of yeast and quick breads, cakes, cookies, pies, and pastries, as well as decorating and icings are undertaken, with emphasis placed on more sophisticated items and gourmet specialties including cakes and pastries for weddings, birthdays and special occasions. Gourmet baked items and pastries are produced in a time restricted quality minded setting. This course is for students pursuing a certificate or degree in culinary arts/culinary management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
9 hours lab, 3 units Grade Only

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 210 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course builds on the skills and knowledge gained in Basic Baking and Pastry. Emphasis is on the safe handling of foods and the production of high quality, handcrafted desserts for retail and commercial bakeries. This course includes techniques in management of quantity preparation. Student will also be familiarized with advanced baking theories and techniques. Students are introduced to a variety of essential ingredients necessary to the professional pastry chef, as well as current trends in equipment. Techniques of sugar cooking and the handling of chocolate are also discussed. Special importance is placed on the following methods: folding, rolling, and piping skills. This course is designed for students interested in high quantity baking and pastry techniques in a commercial setting. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
Hours by Arrangement (One unit of credit is earned for each 75 hours of paid employment or 60 hours of volunteer work.), 1–4 units Grade Only

A program of on-the-job learning experiences for students employed in a job related to their major or their educational goals. The combined maximum credit for all work experience courses from all disciplines may not exceed 16 units. AA/AS; CSU.
3–9 hours other, 1–3 units Grade Only

Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from the instructor for enrollment.

Description: Individual projects and advanced study conducted during supervised laboratory periods. Credit is granted on the basis of one unit for three hours laboratory activity. This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Operations 290. AA/AS; CSU.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts/Culinary Management 110 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: Enrollment in an approved related course. Must obtain an Add Code from the instructor for enrollment. This course is not open to students with previous credit for Food Service Occupations 291.

Description: This course provides practical experiences designed to supplement the basic curriculum and includes special cooperative educational opportunities set up with the College and approved Chefs. Experiences include special and short-order food preparation and service, buffet service, catering, dining room management and service and receiving and storeroom procedures. Large scale and small quantity preparation is produced in a time-restricted quality-minded setting. This course is for students pursuing a career in culinary arts/culinary management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.
This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 296. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.

Dance courses may be used to fulfill the Exercise Science (formerly Physical Education) graduation requirement. See page 108 in the Academic Requirements section of this catalog.

0.5–0.75 hours lecture, 1.5–2.25 hours lab, 1–1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Dance 110.

Description: Ballet I is a course in fundamental ballet technique focusing on correct body alignment and placement through repetition and center work. Students analyze, discuss, and critique the line, design, ballet technique, choreography and dynamics of ballet movements. This course is designed for dance majors and all students interested in Ballet. (FT) AA/ AS; CSU; UC.
0.75 hours lecture, 2.25 hours lab, 1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 110A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: Ballet II is a course in beginning ballet technique focusing on correct body alignment and placement through repetition and center work. Students analyze, discuss, and critique the line, design, ballet technique, choreography and dynamics of ballet movements. This course is designed for dance majors and all students interested in Ballet. (FT) AA/ AS; CSU; UC.
0.75 hours lecture, 2.25 hours lab, 1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 110B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: Ballet III is a course in intermediate ballet technique focusing on correct body alignment and placement through repetition and center work. Students analyze, discuss, and critique the line, design, ballet technique, choreography and dynamics of ballet movements. This course is designed for dance majors and all students interested in Ballet. (FT) AA/ AS; CSU; UC.
0.75 hours lecture, 2.25 hours lab, 1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 110C with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: Ballet IV is a course in Intermediate/Advanced ballet technique focusing on correct body alignment and placement through repetition and center work. Students analyze, discuss, and critique the line, design, ballet technique, choreography and dynamics of ballet movements. This course is designed for dance majors and all students interested in Ballet. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab, 2 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Description: This course is an introduction to multiple cultures and global dance traditions. Each tradition is examined in terms of its particular set of techniques, styles and rhythms. Special emphasis is placed on the exploration of movement characteristic of each cultural dance form. This course is not limited to dance majors and minors. Dance majors are encouraged to expose themselves to a variety of cultural dance forms. Course content, including country, culture and/or dance type, changes each semester. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
0.5–0.75 hours lecture, 1.5–2.25 hours lab, 1–1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Dance 115.

Description: This course is an introduction to Tap dance. Emphasis is placed on fundamental Tap dance technique, vocabulary, rhythms studies and improvisations. This course is designed for dance and theater majors and all students interested in Tap dance. When this course is offered for three hours a week the additional time is utilized in the practice and perfection of rhythmic and sound clarity. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
0.5–0.75 hours lecture, 1.5–2.25 hours lab, 1–1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 115A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the second in a series of Tap dance courses. Emphasis is placed on intermediate Tap dance technique, vocabulary, rhythms studies and improvisations. This course is designed for dance and theater majors and all students interested in Tap dance. When this course is offered for three hours a week the additional time is utilized in the practice and perfection of rhythmic and sound clarity. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
0.5–0.75 hours lecture, 1.5–2.25 hours lab, 1–1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 115B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the third in a series of Tap dance courses. Emphasis is placed on intermediate advanced Tap dance technique, vocabulary, rhythm studies and improvisations. This course is designed for dance and theater majors and all students interested in Tap dance. When this course is offered for three hours a week the additional time is utilized in the practice and perfection of rhythmic and sound clarity. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
0.5–0.75 hours lecture, 1.5–2.25 hours lab, 1–1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 115C with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the fourth in a series of Tap dance courses. Emphasis is placed on advanced Tap dance technique, vocabulary, rhythms studies, improvisations and styles. This course is designed for dance and theater majors and all students interested in Tap dance. When this course is offered for three hours a week the additional time is utilized in the practice and perfection of rhythmic and sound clarity. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
0.5 - 0.75 hours lecture, 1.DANC5 - 2.25 hours lab, 1 - 1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Dance 120.

Description: This course is an introduction to Hip Hop dance. Emphasis is placed on fundamental Hip Hop technique rhythms and styles. This course is designed for dance majors and all students interested in Hip Hop dance. When this course is offered for three hours a week the additional time is utilized in the practice and perfection of combinations. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
0.75 hours lecture, 2.25 hours lab, 1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 120A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the second in a series of Hip Hop dance courses. Emphasis is placed on beginning Hip Hop technique, rhythms and styles. This course is designed for dance majors and all students interested in Hip Hop dance. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
0.75 hours lecture, 2.25 hours lab, 1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 120B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is the third in a series of Hip Hop dance courses. Emphasis is placed on intermediate Hip Hop dance technique, rhythms, styles and choreography. This course is designed for dance majors and all students interested in Hip Hop dance. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
0.75 hours lecture, 2.25 hours lab, 1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 120C with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This course is the fourth in a series of Hip Hop dance courses. Emphasis is placed on advanced Hip Hop dance technique, rhythms, styles and choreography. This course is designed for dance majors and all students interested in Hip Hop dance. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2–3 hours lab, 0.5–1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Dance 126.

Description: This is an introductory course in social and stage dances from the region designated as the Near and Middle East. Emphasis is placed on introductory techniques, styles, rhythms and history of American staged Mid-Eastern dance forms. When this course is offered for three hours a week, the additional time is utilized in practice and perfection of rhythmical isolations and basic locomotor patterns. This course is designed for students who wish to explore dance movements from other cultures. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
2–3 hours lab, 0.5–1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 126A with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: This is the second course in social and stage dances from the region designated as the Near and Middle East. Emphasis is placed on beginning level techniques, styles, rhythms, cymbals and floor work of American staged Mid-Eastern dance forms. When this course is offered for three hours a week the additional time is utilized in practice and perfection of beginning level technique. This course is designed for students who wish to explore dance movements from other cultures. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
1.5–3 hours lab, 0.5–1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 126B with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: Belly Dance III is an intermediate course in a variety of established and emerging belly dance forms. Emphasis is placed on techniques, styles, rhythms, use of various props and performance dynamics of American staged belly dance. When this course is offered for three hours a week the additional time is utilized in practice and perfection of intermediate level skills. This course is designed for students who wish to explore dance movements from other cultures. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
1.5–3 hours lab, 0.5–1 unit Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 126C with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Description: Belly Dance IV is an advanced course in a variety of established and emerging belly dance forms. Emphasis is placed on advanced techniques, styles, rhythms, use of various props and performance dynamics of American staged belly dance. When this course is offered for three hours a week the additional time is utilized in practice and perfection of rhythmical isolations and improvisations. This course is designed for students who wish to explore dance movements from other cultures. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
3 hours lab, 1 unit Grade Only

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5; Dance 110A 135A or 140A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Dance 130.

Description: This course is an introduction to the choreography of renowned choreographers. Students learn and perform selected choreography in ballet, modern, jazz, tap and musical theater. This course is intended for dance majors and all students interested in dance repertoire. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.
0.5–0.75 hours lecture, 1.5–2.25 hours lab, 1–1.5 units Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Dance 135.